Information Course Schedule spring 2023

Upper-Division

Surveying history through the lens of information and information through the lens of history, this course looks across time to consider what might distinguish ours as “the information age” and what that description implies about the role of “information technology” across time. We will select moments in societies’ development of information production, circulation, consumption, and storage from the earliest writing and numbering systems to the world of Social Media. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with what and when, but also with how and why. Throughout we will keep returning to questions about how information-technological developments affect society and vice versa?

Section 1
TuTh 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Paul Duguid
Discussion Section 101
Fr 10:00 am - 11:00 am — 202 South Hall
Discussion Section 102
Fr 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm — 202 South Hall

Three hours of lecture per week. Methods and concepts of creating design requirements and evaluating prototypes and existing systems. Emphasis on computer-based systems, including mobile system and ubiquitous computing, but may be suitable for students interested in other domains of design for end-users. Includes quantitative and qualitative methods as applied to design, usually for short-term term studies intended to provide guidance for designers. Students will receive no credit for 114 after taking 214.

Section 1
Th 3:30 pm - 6:30 pm — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Steve Fadden
Undergraduates interested in INFO 114/214 should sign up... more
Undergraduates interested in INFO 114/214 should sign up for the INFO 114 waitlist. A very LIMITED number of undergraduates will be enrolled into this course. Please have a back up class as it is highly likely you will not get in.

This course is a survey of web technologies that are used to build back-end systems that enable rich web applications. Utilizing technologies such as Python, FastAPI, Docker, RDBMS/NoSQL databases, and Celery/Redis, this class aims to cover the foundational concepts that drive the web today. This class focuses on building APIs using microservices that power everything from content management systems to data engineering pipelines that provide insights by processing large amounts of data. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the technical issues surrounding back-end systems today and to provide a solid and comprehensive perspective of the web’s constantly evolving landscape.

Section 1
Mo 9:00 am - 11:00 am — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kay Ashaolu
Laboratory Section 101
Fr 9:00 am - 10:00 am — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kay Ashaolu
Undergraduates should waitlist for INFO 153B. This is the same course as INFO 253B. A limited number of undergraduates will be enrolled in the course as we approach the beginning of the semester. Note that undergraduate enrollment in the course will be limited, so we encourage you to work with your undergraduate advisor to ensure you have a backup plan in the event that you do not make it into the class.

This course introduces students to natural language processing and exposes them to the variety of methods available for reasoning about text in computational systems. NLP is deeply interdisciplinary, drawing on both linguistics and computer science, and helps drive much contemporary work in text analysis (as used in computational social science, the digital humanities, and computational journalism). We will focus on major algorithms used in NLP for various applications (part-of-speech tagging, parsing, coreference resolution, machine translation) and on the linguistic phenomena those algorithms attempt to model. Students will implement algorithms and create linguistically annotated data on which those algorithms depend.

Section 1
TuTh 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm — Li Ka Shing 245
Instructor(s): David Bamman

Graduate

Introduces the data sciences landscape, with a particular focus on learning data science techniques to uncover and answer the questions students will encounter in industry. Lectures, readings, discussions, and assignments will teach how to apply disciplined, creative methods to ask better questions, gather data, interpret results, and convey findings to various audiences. The emphasis throughout is on making practical contributions to real decisions that organizations will and should make.

Section 1
We 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm — Physics Building 2
Instructor(s): Michael Rivera

This course is designed to be an introduction to the topics and issues associated with information and information technology and its role in society. Throughout the semester we will consider both the consequence and impact of technologies on social groups and on social interaction and how society defines and shapes the technologies that are produced. Students will be exposed to a broad range of applied and practical problems, theoretical issues, as well as methods used in social scientific analysis. The four sections of the course are: 1) theories of technology in society, 2) information technology in workplaces 3) automation vs. humans, and 4) networked sociability.

Section 1
We 10:00 am - 12:00 pm — 60 Evans
Instructor(s): Morgan Ames
This course is for I School MIMS & PhD students ONLY.
This course is for I School MIMS & PhD students ONLY.

This course uses examples from various commercial domains — retail, health, credit, entertainment, social media, and biosensing/quantified self — to explore legal and ethical issues including freedom of expression, privacy, research ethics, consumer protection, information and cybersecurity, and copyright. The class emphasizes how existing legal and policy frameworks constrain, inform, and enable the architecture, interfaces, data practices, and consumer facing policies and documentation of such offerings; and, fosters reflection on the ethical impact of information and communication technologies and the role of information professionals in legal and ethical work.

Section 1
TuTh 9:30 am - 11:00 am — 202 South Hall
This course is for I School MIMS & PhD students ONLY.
This course is for I School MIMS & PhD students ONLY.

This course addresses concepts and methods of user experience research, from understanding and identifying needs, to evaluating concepts and designs, to assessing the usability of products and solutions. We emphasize methods of collecting and interpreting qualitative data about user activities, working both individually and in teams, and translating them into design decisions. Students gain hands-on practice with observation, interview, survey, focus groups, and expert review. Team activities and group work are required during class and for most assignments. Additional topics include research in enterprise, consulting, and startup organizations, lean/agile techniques, mobile research approaches, and strategies for communicating findings.

Section 1
Th 3:30 pm - 6:30 pm — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Steve Fadden
Undergraduates should waitlist for INFO 114. Very few... more
Undergraduates should waitlist for INFO 114. Very few undergrads will be accepted, please have a back-up course.

"Behavioral Economics" is one important perspective on how information impacts human behavior. The goal of this class is to deploy a few important theories about the relationship between information and behavior, into practical settings — emphasizing the design of experiments that can now be incorporated into many 'applications' in day-to-day life. Truly 'smart systems' will have built into them precise, testable propositions about how human behavior can be modified by what the systems tell us and do for us. So let's design these experiments into our systems from the ground up! This class develops a theoretically informed, practical point of view on how to do that more effectively and with greater impact.

Section 1
TuTh 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm — Internet/Online

Discusses application of social psychological theory and research to information technologies and systems; we focus on sociological social psychology, which largely focuses on group processes, networks, and interpersonal relationships. Information technologies considered include software systems used on the internet such as social networks, email, and social games, as well as specific hardware technologies such as mobile devices, computers, wearables, and virtual/augmented reality devices. We examine human communication practices, through the lens of different social psychology theories, including: symbolic interaction, identity theories, social exchange theory, status construction theory, and social networks and social structure theory.

Section 1
MoWe 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm — 210 South Hall
Instructor is Judd Antin
Instructor is Judd Antin

The design and presentation of digital information. Use of graphics, animation, sound, visualization software, and hypermedia in presenting information to the user. Methods of presenting complex information to enhance comprehension and analysis. Incorporation of visualization techniques into human-computer interfaces. Three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.

Section 1
TuTh 11:00 am - 12:30 pm — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst
Laboratory Section 101
Tu 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm — 210 South Hall
Section 2
TuTh 11:00 am - 12:30 pm — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst
Section 102
Tu 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm — 202 South Hall

Provides a theoretical and practical introduction to modern techniques in applied machine learning. Covers key concepts in supervised and unsupervised machine learning, including the design of machine learning experiments, algorithms for prediction and inference, optimization, and evaluation. Students will learn functional, procedural, and statistical programming techniques for working with real-world data.

Section 1
WeFr 8:00 am - 9:30 am — 210 South Hall
Instructor is Muhammad Raza Khan.
Instructor is Muhammad Raza Khan.
Discussion Section 101
We 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm — 210 South Hall

This course is a survey of web technologies that are used to build back-end systems that enable rich web applications. Utilizing technologies such as Python, Flask, Docker, RDBMS/NoSQL databases, and Spark, this class aims to cover the foundational concepts that drive the web today. This class focuses on building APIs using micro-services that power everything from content management systems to data engineering pipelines that provide insights by processing large amounts of data. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the technical issues surrounding back-end systems today, and to provide a solid and comprehensive perspective of the web’s constantly evolving landscape.

Section 1
Mo 9:00 am - 11:00 am — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kay Ashaolu
Laboratory Section 101
Fr 9:00 am - 10:00 am — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kay Ashaolu

The course overviews a broad number of paradigms of privacy from a technical point of view. The course is designed to assist system engineers and information systems professionals in getting familiar with the subject of privacy engineering and train them in implementing those mechanisms. In addition, the course is designed to coach those professionals to critically think about the strengths and weaknesses of the different privacy paradigms. These skills are important for cybersecurity professionals and enable them to effectively incorporate privacy-awareness in the design phase of their products.

Section 1
Mo 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Daniel Aranki

This course introduces students to natural language processing and exposes them to the variety of methods available for reasoning about text in computational systems. NLP is deeply interdisciplinary, drawing on both linguistics and computer science, and helps drive much contemporary work in text analysis (as used in computational social science, the digital humanities, and computational journalism). We will focus on major algorithms used in NLP for various applications (part-of-speech tagging, parsing, coreference resolution, machine translation) and on the linguistic phenomena those algorithms attempt to model. Students will implement algorithms and create linguistically annotated data on which those algorithms depend.

Section 1
TuTh 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm — Li Ka Shing 245
Instructor(s): David Bamman

This course will cover new interface metaphors beyond desktops (e.g., for mobile devices, computationally enhanced environments, tangible user interfaces) but will also cover visual design basics (e.g., color, layout, typography, iconography) so that we have systematic and critical understanding of aesthetically engaging interfaces. Students will get a hands-on learning experience on these topics through course projects, design critiques, and discussion, in addition to lectures and readings. Two hours of lecture per week.

Section 1
Fr 9:30 am - 12:30 pm — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kimiko Ryokai

Three hours of seminar per week.  This seminar reviews current literature and debates regarding Information and Communication Technologies and Development (ICTD). This is an interdisciplinary and practice-oriented field that draws on insights from economics, sociology, engineering, computer science, management, public health, etc.

Section 1
MoWe 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jay Chen

This course provides students with real-world experience assisting politically vulnerable organizations and persons around the world to develop and implement sound cybersecurity practices. In the classroom, students study basic theories and practices of digital security, intricacies of protecting largely under-resourced organizations, and tools needed to manage risk in complex political, sociological, legal, and ethical contexts. In the clinic, students work in teams supervised by Clinic staff to provide direct cybersecurity assistance to civil society organizations. We emphasize pragmatic, workable solutions that take into account the unique needs of each partner organization.

Section 1
MoWe 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm — Internet/Online
Instructor(s): Tiffany Rad
Enrollment into this course is by application ONLY. Please... more
Enrollment into this course is by application ONLY. Please submit the online application to apply for course enrollment: https://ischool.berkeley.edu/cc-app Priority application deadline for Spring 2023 is Tuesday, November 1st, 2022. Students must attend the first class on Monday, January 9th, 2023.

For this course, we are going to tackle one of the world’s biggest challenges (voted on by the students). We will organize as an innovation lab tasked with developing new products and so as to better understand the principles, process, and outputs of interaction design. The goal will be to be able to apply the concepts and frameworks we cover in class to a real problem space.

Students will be responsible for developing a robust prototype over the final few weeks of the course. They will also write a reflection on the prototype development process, drawing on the theoretical concepts covered in the course. On the last day of class, students will present their work to a panel of industry experts for feedback.

Section 1
Fr 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Laith Ulaby

The Future of Cybersecurity Working Group (FCWG) assembles students, researchers, and faculty from across the campus with a shared interest in security. We read and discuss the current cybersecurity scholarship and workshop projects related to cybersecurity. Our goal is to support critical inquiry into security and explore how it relates to political science, law, economics, the military, and intelligence gathering. Students are required to participate in weekly sessions, present short papers on the readings, and write response pieces.

Section 6
Mo 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Andrew Reddie

This course will explore what HCI knowledge and methods can bring to the study, design, and evaluation of AI systems with a particular emphasis on the human, social, and ethical impact of those systems. Students will read papers and engage in discussions around the three main components of a human-centered design process as it relates to an AI system:

  1. needs assessment,
  2. design and development, and
  3. evaluation.

Following these three main design phases, students will learn what needs assessment might look like for designing AI systems, how those systems might be prototyped, and what HCI methods for real-world evaluation can teach us about evaluating AI systems in their context of use. The course will also discuss challenges that are unique to AI systems, such as understanding and communicating technical capabilities and recognizing and recovering from errors.

Guest lectures will be given by experts in AI ethics (e.g., Timnit Gebru) and fairness, accountability, and transparency in AI systems (e.g., Motahhare Eslami).

Section 2
Tu 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Niloufar Salehi

Peoples and communities around the world will be confronting the challenges of climate change, ecosystem degradation, and biodiversity loss for many decades to come. This course will explore the different ways in which the informatics and computing field can contribute to our individual and collective efforts to mitigate and adapt to the effects of climate change.

Through readings and discussions, students will critically engage with foundational and leading-edge perspectives on diverse topics such as systems thinking for sustainable computing, sustainability in/through design, collapse informatics, fighting climate misinformation and climate anxiety, as well as how knowledge and tools from the fields of machine learning, human-computer interaction, web3, IoT, and remote sensing are being applied to novel solutions in many different settings.

Student-led projects will research the information needs and information seeking behaviors of individuals and communities, both now and into the future, and design information tools and resources to support them in their efforts of climate mitigation, adaptation, advocacy, and education.

Section 5
MoWe 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): John Chuang

Data and the algorithmic systems are ubiquitous in everyday life. These data encode our daily choices, actions, and behaviors, as well as our more persistent social identities. They also enrich the lives of some while limiting the life chances of others. In this way, data generated and collected about us form a type of information infrastructure: pervasive, hidden, and at times insidious. As technology and data-driven systems increasingly enter into our public, professional, and personal spheres, more of these worlds become encoded in data and result in shifts in the power relations within those worlds. In a word, data is a medium which reconfigures power.

In this seminar, we will engage readings around data, power, and infrastructure, drawing from a number of interdisciplinary academic, artistic, and activist traditions. We’ll discuss topics related to state projects of legibility and quantification; the genealogy of the modern data subject; the politics of classification systems; the surveillance of Blackness and the carceral logics of technology; administrative violence and trans and gender non-conforming identities; the invisible labor powering data-driven systems; and the resistances, obfuscations, and refusals to datafication and surveillance.

Section 1
We 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm — 202 South Hall
Instructor is Alex Hanna.
Instructor is Alex Hanna.

A reading and research seminar that delves into issues related to the politics of information. We will be reading book-length treatments of key issues, including content moderation, data and surveillance, industry structure, information privacy, internet security, and global policy measures. Students will be expected to actively contribute to class discussions, and to produce a research paper or research proposal on a related topic. 

Section 3
Mo 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): AnnaLee Saxenian
Prerequisite: Prior knowledge of the issues, as... more
Prerequisite: Prior knowledge of the issues, as demonstrated by completion of INFO290 in 2021 or 2022, or by instructor's permission.

Will artificial intelligence technologies revolutionize warfare? Do cyberattacks represent an act of war? How do governments drive technological innovation in support of national security? What is the responsibility of the private sector when engaging in R&D with dual-use applications? To answer these questions, this course examines the intersection between politics, security, and technology both in the United States and across the globe.

The course is divided into four parts:

  1. Linking Politics, Security, and Technology in Theory
  2. Technology and War: A History
  3. Contemporary Debates: Today’s “Emerging” Technologies
  4. Tomorrow’s Technologies

Given the necessary breadth, our seminar will consider work from international relations, economics, science and technology studies, law, as well as non-academic writing in popular outlets. Topics include: offset strategies, offense-defense balance theory, grey-zone competition, conceptualizing strategic stability, escalation, the economics of industrial policy, and innovation policy. Technologies considered include: robotics, autonomous platforms (UAVs, UUVs), sensors for remote detection, machine learning, hypersonic missiles, missile defense technologies, and nuclear modernization.

Section 2
Mo 9:00 am - 12:00 pm — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Andrew Reddie

In this course you’ll learn industry-standard agile and lean software development techniques such as test-driven development, refactoring, pair programming, and specification through example. You’ll also learn good object-oriented programming style. We’ll cover the theory and principles behind agile engineering practices, such as continuous integration and continuous delivery.

This class will be taught in a flip-the-classroom format, with students programming in class. We'll use the Java programming language. Students need not be expert programmers, but should be enthusiastic about learning to program. Please come to class with laptops, and install IntelliJ IDEA community edition. Students signing up should be comfortable writing simple programs in Java (or a Java-like language such as C#).

Section 1
Fr 12:30 pm - 3:30 pm — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jez Humble

An intensive weekly discussion of current and ongoing research by Ph.D. students with a research interest in issues of information (social, legal, technical, theoretical, etc.). Our goal is to focus on critiquing research problems, theories, and methodologies from multiple perspectives so that we can produce high-quality, publishable work in the interdisciplinary area of information research. Circulated material may include dissertation chapters, qualifying papers, article drafts, and/or new project ideas. We want to have critical and productive discussion, but above all else we want to make our work better: more interesting, more accessible, more rigorous, more theoretically grounded, and more like the stuff we enjoy reading.

Section 1
Tu 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm — 205 South Hall
Instructor is Judd Antin
Instructor is Judd Antin

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 1
Fr 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm — 107 South Hall