Information Course Schedule fall 2016

Lower Division Courses

Foundations of data science from three perspectives: inferential thinking, computational thinking, and real-world relevance. Given data arising from some real-world phenomenon, how does one analyze that data so as to understand that phenomenon? The course teaches critical concepts and skills in computer programming and statistical inference, in conjunction with hands-on analysis of real-world datasets, including economic data, document collections, geographical data, and social networks. It delves into social and legal issues surrounding data analysis, including issues of privacy and data ownership.

Also listed as Computer Science C8 and Statistics C8.

MWF 10-11 am | 1 Pimentel

This course provides an introduction to critical and ethical issues surrounding data and society. It blends social and historical perspectives on data with ethics, policy, and case examples to help students develop a workable understanding of current ethical issues in data science. Ethical and policy-related concepts addressed include: research ethics; privacy and surveillance; data and discrimination; and the “black box” of algorithms. Importantly, these issues will be addressed throughout the lifecycle of data — from collection to storage to analysis and application. Course assignments will emphasize researcher and practitioner reflexivity, allowing students to explore their own social and ethical commitments.

Student Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to critically assess their own work and education in the area of data science; to identify and articulate basic ethical and policy-based frameworks; and to understand the relationship between data, ethics, and society

M 12-2 PM | 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Anna Lauren Hoffmann

Upper Division Courses

Three hours of lecture per week. With the advent of virtual communities and online social networks, old questions about the meaning of human social behavior have taken on renewed significance. Using a variety of online social media simultaneously, and drawing upon theoretical literature in a variety of disciplines, this course delves into discourse about community across disciplines. This course will enable students to establish both theoretical and experiential foundations for making decisions and judgments regarding the relations between mediated communication and human community.

Students will receive no credit for Sociology C167/Information C167 after taking Sociology 167.

Also listed as Sociology C167.

TuTh 5-6:30 PM | 2050 VLSB
Instructor(s): Edwin Lin

Harnessing the power of “civic tech” (data, digital, design) to drive policy outcomes

From criminal justice to health care to municipal services, civic technology is transforming the public sector. Taught by experts from the California Department of Justice, this course explores the emerging disciplines of data science, digital services, and user­-centered design and their implications for government and public policy.

Data products can provide clarity on impact, helping to identify which policies and practices are working, and where interventions are most needed. Digital services that integrate data and user-centered design are helping governments a) deliver in ways that are both convenient and cost-effective for the public, b) build trust by providing transparency into and accountability for how institutions are functioning, and c) engage the civic-minded community to build ongoing constructive feedback mechanisms. On the other hand, the use of these approaches also poses unique challenges, ranging from poor data quality, to (mis)interpretation of statistics, to difficulty in conveying insights, and using those insights to transform operations and service delivery.

This course will use recent events in the criminal justice system and the California Department of Justice’s new OpenJustice initiative (http://openjustice.doj.ca.gov) as a central case study to understand the challenges and solution space for data-driven public policy. It will cover the full life cycle: from the dynamics of passing data legislation, to data collection and sharing, to data analysis (statistics, machine learning), publication (open data, visualization, dashboards), engagement strategies, and policy making.  It will explore the challenge of ensuring that data is actionable for internal and external users, that it is acted-upon, and that it actually informs and improves services and service delivery.

Overall, the goal is for students to understand the various components required to move from the limited uses of data as a “box-checking” exercise to a primary policy driver. Students will explore these topics via individual and group-based projects, including hands-on classroom assignments. The mid-term project will include a legislative proposal for new data collection and an implementation plan. The final project will include robust analysis of existing data, visualizations of findings, and an engagement plan. Data sets will be drawn from the OpenJustice portal as well as other public safety, public health and education data sources.

Knowledge of Excel is recommended; familiarity with statistical programming in Python or similar languages may be helpful but not required. Recommendations for resources to learn these skills will be provided as part of the course.

This course is intended to be 2 units but is currently awaiting Academic Senate approval to be offered with this unit count. Students may notice that the official CalCentral listing currently indicates 3 units. Check back later in August for updates.

Section: 2
M 4-6pm | 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Justin Erlich, Sundeep Pattem

This is a weekly one-hour seminar on the latest topics in the field of Natural Language Processing (also known as Computational Linguistics). Researchers from across UC Berkeley as well as visitors from out of town will present their recent work for discussion and feedback. Past topics have included multilingual language processing, analyzing social text, analyzing text using joint models, unsupervised morphology induction using word embeddings, deep learning of visual question answering, and unsupervised transcription of music and language.

In Fall 2016, we will meet every week, with alternating weeks consisting of discussions of readings and presentations of new research by local and visiting speakers.

Anyone is welcome to audit the course. Graduate students and undergraduates may enroll in this course for 1 unit of credit. In order to earn that unit of credit, students must write a synopsis of a research paper every two weeks, must attend at least 11 class meetings (and arrive on time), and must lead (or co-lead) at least one discussion of a research paper during the course of the semester.


This course is cross listed as Computer Science 294 and Information 290.

Section: 1
M 3:30-4:30pm | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst, David Bamman

Free communication has changed the world, including the expectations and work and play. The class begins with the two data revolutions--the first about passively collected clicks on the web, the second about actively contributed data, as platforms like Facebook empower individuals to contribute a variety of quantitative and qualitative data (transactions, social relations, attention gestures, intention, location, and more.) With active student participation, we explore the far-reaching implications of the consumer data revolution for individuals, communities, business, and society.

Section: 3
Tu 3:30-6:30 PM (Meets on nine dates: Aug. 30, Sept. 6, Sept. 13, Sept. 20, Sept. 27, Oct. 4, Oct. 11, Oct. 18, Oct. 25) | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Andreas Weigend

Core Courses

8 weeks; 3 hours of lecture per week. This course introduces the intellectual foundations of information organization and retrieval: conceptual modeling, semantic representation, vocabulary and metadata design, classification, and standardization, as well as information retrieval practices, technology, and applications, including computational processes for analyzing information in both textual and non-textual formats.

This is a required introductory course for MIMS students, integrating perspectives and best practices from a wide range of disciplines.

NOTE: Before Fall 2017, Info 202 was offered as a full-semester course for 4 units.

MW 9-10:30 AM | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Robert Glushko, David Bamman

7 weeks - 4 hours of laboratory per week. This course introduces software skills used in building prototype scripts for applications in data science and information management. The course gives an overview of procedural programming, object-oriented programming, and functional programming techniques in the Python scripting language, together with an overview of fundamental data structures, associated algorithms, and asymptotic performance analysis. Students will watch a set of instructional videos covering material and will have four hours of laboratory-style course contact each week.

NOTE: Before Fall 2017, Info 206 was titled “Distributed Computing Applications and Infrastructure” and was offered as a full-semester course for 4 units.

TuTh 9-10:30 AM | 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Doug Tygar

General Courses

Three hours of lecture per week. User interface design and human-computer interaction. Examination of alternative design. Tools and methods for design and development. Human- computer interaction. Methods for measuring and evaluating interface quality.

This course covers the design, prototyping, and evaluation of user interfaces to computers which is often called Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). It is loosely based on course CS1 described in the ACM SIGCHI Curricula for Human-Computer Interaction (Association for Computing Machinery, 1992).

HCI covers many topics including:

  1. Human capabilities (e.g., visual and auditory perception, memory, mental models, and interface metaphors);
  2. Interface technology (e.g., input and output devices, interaction styles, and common interface paradigms); and,
  3. Interface design methods (e.g., user-centered design, prototyping, and design principles and rules), and interface evaluation (e.g., software logging, user observation, benchmarks and experiments).

This material is covered through lectures, reading, discussions, homework assignments, and a course project. This course differs from CS 160 primarily in two ways:

  1. There is an emphasis on interfaces for information technology applications; and,
  2. There is less emphasis on programming and system development, although some simple prototyping (for example, in visual basic or using JAVA GUI development tools) may be required. (CS 160 has a big programming project.)
F 1-4 PM | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Robert Youmans

This course covers the practical and theoretical issues associated with computer-mediated communication (CMC) systems. CMC includes many different types of technologies such as email, newsgroups, chat, and online games. We will focus on the analysis of CMC practices, the social structures that emerge when people use these applications, and the design and implementation issues associated with constructing CMC technologies.

We will primarily take a social scientific approach to computer-mediated communication (including research from psychology, social psychology, economics, and sociology). We will investigate questions such as: How do we represent identity and perceive others in CMC environments? How are interfaces and visualizations used in CMC to help make sense of relationships? Why do some Wikis "succeed" while others do not? How is the production of open source software such as Linux similar to (and different from) a social movement? Why are reputations useful in some online environments, and not in others? Can we really develop meaningful relationships and perhaps even love-purely through CMC?

This course was previously offered as INFO 290-12.

TuTh 3:30-5 PM | 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Coye Cheshire, Jennifer King

This course focuses on managing people in information-intensive firms and industries, such as information technology industries. Students who seek careers in these industries will soon be asked to manage people, teams, departments, and units. They need to learn how to manage. However, managing is sometimes very different in these settings: Employees are highly educated; work is more fluid; teamwork and collaboration are essential; and external situations and strategies change rapidly. For these reasons several management principles born in a traditional manufacturing era no longer apply. In particular, the old style of “command and control” needs to give way to more distributed ways of work, with significant consequences for how managers need to manage. Of course, some universal management principles apply no matter what circumstance.

While we will cover these universal management principles in this course, we will pay particular attention to management issues that are highly relevant in information-intensive settings. Topics to be covered will likely include: managing knowledge workers; managing teams (incl. virtual ones); collaborating across disparate units, giving and receiving feedback; managing the innovation process (incl. in eco-systems); managing through networks; and managing when using communication tools (e.g., tele-presence). The course will rely heavily on cases as a pedagogical form.

This course satisfies the Management of Information Projects & Organizations requirement.

Th 6-9:30pm | Cheit C125
Instructor(s): Morten Hansen

"Behavioral Economics" is one important perspective on how information impacts human behavior. The goal of this class is to deploy a few important theories about the relationship between information and behavior, into practical settings — emphasizing the design of experiments that can now be incorporated into many 'applications' in day-to-day life. Truly 'smart systems' will have built into them precise, testable propositions about how human behavior can be modified by what the systems tell us and do for us. So let's design these experiments into our systems from the ground up! This class develops a theoretically informed, practical point of view on how to do that more effectively and with greater impact.

Previously offered as Info 290. Applied Behavioral Economics for Information Systems.

TuTh 2-3:30 PM | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Steven Weber

This course is a survey of Web technologies, ranging from the basic technologies underlying the Web (URI, HTTP, HTML) to more advanced technologies being  used in the the context of Web engineering, for example structured data  formats and Web programming frameworks. The goal of this course is to provide an  overview of the technical issues surrounding the Web today, and to provide a  solid and comprehensive perspective of the Web's constantly evolving landscape.

Students will receive no credit for 253 after taking 290. Web Architecture.

F 9 AM-12 PM | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kay Ashaolu

This course examines the state-of-the-art in applied Natural Language Processing (also known as content analysis and language engineering), with an emphasis on how well existing algorithms perform and how they can be used (or not) in applications. Topics include part-of-speech tagging, shallow parsing, text classification, information extraction, incorporation of lexicons and ontologies into text analysis, and question answering. Students will apply and extend existing software tools to text-processing problems.

Restrictions for non–I School students interested in taking Info 256.

MW 10:30 AM-12 PM | 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst

Three hours of lecture per week. This course is concerned with the use of Database Management Systems (DBMS) to solve a wide range of information storage, management and retrieval problems, in organizations ranging from large corporations to personal applications, such as research data management. The course combines the practical aspects of DBMS use with more theoretical discussions of database design methodologies and the "internals" of database systems.

A significant part of the course will require students to design their own database and implement it on different DBMS that run on different computer systems. We will use both ACCESS and ORACLE.

In the theoretical portion of the course, we will examine the major types or data models of DBMS (hierarchical, network, relational, and object-oriented). We will discuss the principles and problems of database design, operation, and maintenance for each data model.

TuTh 10:30 AM-12 PM | 202 South Hall

This course will explore the theory and practice of Tangible User Interfaces, a new approach to HCI which focuses on the physical interaction with computational media. The topics covered in the course include:

  • Theoretical framework of Tangible User Interfaces
  • Design examples of Tangible User Interfaces
  • Enabling technologies for Tangible User Interfaces

Students will design and develop experimental Tangible User Interfaces, applications, underlying technologies, and theories using concept sketches, posters, physical mockups, working prototypes, and a final project report. The course will have 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of laboratory per week.

Note:  Previously listed as Info 290: Theory and Practice of Tangible User Interfaces. Students who completed INFO 290 section 4 in Fall 2008 will receive no credit for Info 262.

This course is cross-listed as New Media C262.

MW 2-3:30 pm | 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kimiko Ryokai

This course will focus upon the use of qualitative methods for research about information technologies. Methods including interviewing, focus groups, participant observation and ethnography will be taught and practiced. Significant qualitative research findings about the social impact of information technologies will be read, to analyze what we know about IT thus far, how we know it, and as models of theories and methods for future research. Frequent field exercises will be assigned to develop qualitative research skills and best practices, but the primary assignment will be to engage in a substantial fieldwork project. Methods covered will include video if grant support or other budget resources are found.

TuTh 10:30 AM-12 PM | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jenna Burrell

Special Topics Courses

The ICTD group seminar will discuss topics of current interest in the emerging multidisciplinary field of Information and Communications Technologies and Development, or ICTD. Each semester will be focused on a particular topic or set of topics, under the direction of appropriate faculty from the I School's ICTD group. The course content will consist of paper discussions, invited lectures from both within and outside the class and a some relatively short written assignments. Students will also be responsible for presenting during at least on class session, either on their own research, ideas or on a selected set of papers relevant to the semester's chosen topic.

Section: 4
M 11 AM-12 PM | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Heather Hudson

What insights about student learning can be revealed from data, and how can those insights be used to improve the efficacy of educational technology? This course will cover computational approaches to the task of modeling learning and improving outcomes in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) and Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). We will cover theories and methodologies underpinning current approaches to knowledge discovery and data mining in education and survey the latest developments in the broad field of human learning research.

This course will be project based, where teams will be introduced to online learning platforms and their datasets with the objective of pairing data analysis with theory or implementation. Literature review will serve to add context and grounding to projects.

Suggested background includes one programming course and familiarity with one statistical/computational software package.

The study of learning in online environments is an interdisciplinary pursuit, and therefore all majors are welcomed and encouraged to bring complimentary backgrounds.

Undergraduates with the appropriate background and motivation are encouraged to enroll but must contact Associate Director of Student Affairs Catherine Cronquist Browning for enrollment permissions.

NOTE: This course is cross-listed as Education 290A. Formative Assessment in Virtual Learning Environments.

(Currently offered as Info C260F.)

Section: 5
TuTh 12:30-2 | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Zachary Pardos

This is a weekly one-hour seminar on the latest topics in the field of Natural Language Processing (also known as Computational Linguistics). Researchers from across UC Berkeley as well as visitors from out of town will present their recent work for discussion and feedback. Past topics have included multilingual language processing, analyzing social text, analyzing text using joint models, unsupervised morphology induction using word embeddings, deep learning of visual question answering, and unsupervised transcription of music and language.

In Fall 2016, we will meet every week, with alternating weeks consisting of discussions of readings and presentations of new research by local and visiting speakers.

Anyone is welcome to audit the course. Graduate students and undergraduates may enroll in this course for 1 unit of credit. In order to earn that unit of credit, students must write a synopsis of a research paper every two weeks, must attend at least 11 class meetings (and arrive on time), and must lead (or co-lead) at least one discussion of a research paper during the course of the semester.

This course is cross listed as Computer Science 294 and Information 190.

Section: 1
M 3:30-4:30pm | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst, David Bamman

Information privacy law profoundly shapes how internet-enabled services may work. Privacy Law for Technologists will translate the regulatory demands flowing from the growing field of privacy and security law to those who are creating interesting and transformative internet-enabled services. The course will meet twice a week, with the first session focusing on the formal requirements of the law, and the second on how technology might accommodate regulatory demands and goals. Topics include:  Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (reverse engineering, scraping, computer attacks), unfair/deceptive trade practices, ECPA, children’s privacy, big data and discrimination (FCRA, ECOA), DMCA, intermediary liability issues, ediscovery and data retention, the anti-marketing laws, and technical requirements flowing from the EU-US Privacy Shield.

Required textbook: FTC Privacy Law and Policy (CUP 2016)

Section: 6
TuTh 10:30 AM-12 PM | 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Chris Jay Hoofnagle

Just as the web browser brought us click-stream data and the mobile phone brought us geo-location data, ubiquitous low-cost sensors integrated with wearable and Internet-of-Things devices will bring us a new torrent of user data to collect, analyze, and exploit. The course takes a hands-on approach to exploring the possibilities and limitations of consumer-grade sensing technologies for physiological and contextual data.

We will survey the intellectual foundations and research advances in ubiquitous computing, physiological and affective computing, with applications in health and wellness, social computing, information security, novel user interfaces, etc. We will cover temporal and spectral techniques for time-series data analysis. We will consider data stewardship issues, including data ownership, data privacy, and research ethics. The class lending library will provide access to a variety of devices that can be used for data collection and application prototyping.

Project work can be undertaken in a variety of application domains, such as affective computing, ambient assisted living, biometric authentication, privacy by design, quantified self, smart cars and homes, social robotics, and virtual and augmented reality.

Section: 3
TuTh 12:30-2 PM | 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): John Chuang

Much as Adam Smith saw his own age as marked by its engagement with “commerce” and thereby distinguished from all ages that had come before, it has become conventional to see our own era as a break from all that has preceded it, and thus distinguished principally by its engagement with information and computing technologies. Scholars have labeled the contemporary era as the “post-industrial,” “postmodern,” or “network society,” but probably the most widely used and enduring characterization distinguishes the present day as the “information age” or “information society.” This course will explore the notion of an “information society,” trying to understand what scholars have held to be the essential and distinguishing features of such a society, how these views compare with classic theories of society or with alternative accounts of the present age, and to what extent different conceptions of the “information age” are compatible. In pursuing this investigation, we shall bear in mind the admonition of the legal scholar James Boyle that while the idea of an “information age” may be “useful ... we need a critical social theory to understand it.” In the process of developing a critical, social, and political-economic analysis of this idea, we hope to assemble a corpus of information society readings.

Requirements: We will proceed by reading theorists in contrasting pairs in each class seeking to understand and compare the ways in which society is characterized in each account. All students will be asked to post their thoughts on the readings before each class. Each student will be expected to take responsibility for guiding the discussion in one class. Every few weeks, we will pause to consider how to apply these theoretical perspectives in our own research and writing, at which time students will be required to submit a one- page essay reflecting on how the works read up to that point construct and use theory and how the student might rely on or challenge these theories in the student’s own work. Each student will be required to submit a final paper exploring a subject to be agreed on with the instructors that relates the works and discussions of the course to the student’s own work and interests. Papers should be twenty pages long and submitted by the last day of exam week (December 16).

Section: 2
Tu 3:30-6:30 PM | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Paul Duguid, Ashwin Mathew

Free communication has changed the world, including the expectations and work and play. The class begins with the two data revolutions--the first about passively collected clicks on the web, the second about actively contributed data, as platforms like Facebook empower individuals to contribute a variety of quantitative and qualitative data (transactions, social relations, attention gestures, intention, location, and more.) With active student participation, we explore the far-reaching implications of the consumer data revolution for individuals, communities, business, and society.

This course was previously offered for 1 unit; in Fall 2016, the course increased to 2 units.

Section: 3
Tu 3:30-6:30 PM (Meets on nine dates: Aug. 30, Sept. 6, Sept. 13, Sept. 20, Sept. 27, Oct. 4, Oct. 11, Oct. 18, Oct. 25) | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Andreas Weigend

Every business depends on information — about customers, competitors, trends, performance, etc. Entire curricula have been focused on the technological, systems, strategic, and management challenges associated with that dependency. This course, however, looks at a different intersection between information and business. Specifically, it will explore how entrepreneurs across the world are developing ventures fundamentally centered on new and emerging information technologies and the business models and strategies they make possible. These include not only the Googles, Amazons, and Facebooks of the world, but also ventures like Comat and Samasource. In some cases, these are efforts on the proverbial cutting edge of technology; more often they involve creative application and/or integration of existing information technologies in innovative ways.

We will first examine the key elements of business models and the entrepreneurial process, before looking in more detail at a variety of ventures leveraging information-based technologies and strategies in an array of markets. Using of mix of case-study discussion, short lectures, and focused conversations with active entrepreneurs, this will be a highly interactive and collaborative course — not a sit-listen-take-notes type of class.

Expect to be actively involved in a series of in-class and outside assignments, both individual- and team-based, that will help you develop an understanding of how entrepreneurs are using information-centric technologies to create new markets and redefine old ones, and the lessons learned along the way. You may also explore your own ideas for new ventures along the way.

NOTE: This course was previously offered as 290. Information-Centric Entrepreneurship & Startup Strategies.

Section: 1
Th 3:30-5:30 PM | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kurt Beyer

This course is designed to give participants a practical overview of the modern lean/agile product management paradigm based on contemporary industry practice. We cover the complete lifecycle of product management, from discovering your customers and users through to sales, marketing and managing teams. We'll take an experimental approach throughout, showing how to minimize investment and output while maximizing the information we discover in order to support effective decision-making. During the course, we'll show how to apply the theory through hands-on collaborative problem-solving activities. There will also be guest lectures from industry experts.

This course satisfies the Management requirement for the MIMS degree.

In Fall 2015 & Fall 2016, this course was offered for 2 units.

Section: 2
M 10:30 AM-12:30 PM (Note new time) | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jez Humble

Students will work on the full-stack web development process while applying concepts taught in INFO 202, “Information Organization and Retrieval,” which is a pre- or co-requisite for the course. Students will apply concepts and techniques for information architecture, resource description and transformation, categorization, and interaction design.  Individual and team assignments will enable students to develop skills in data modeling, API design, responsive front-end design, version control, and deployment using Python, XML, jQuery and other tools and frameworks.

This course satisfies the technology requirement for the MIMS degree.

TuTh 12:30-2pm | 202 South Hall

Seminars & Colloquia

One hour colloquium per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Colloquia, discussion, and readings are designed to introduce students to the range of interests of the school.

M 12:30-2 PM | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): John Chuang

The seminar explores selected advanced topics relating to 'digital libraries' with special emphasis on:

  • Access to networked resources
  • Use of two or more resources in conjunction
  • Combined use of two or more retrieval systems (e.g. use of pre- or post-processing to enhance the capabilities)
  • The redesign of library services

 

It is expected that these issues will require attention to a number of questions about the nature of information retrieval processes, the feasibility of not-yet-conventional techniques, techniques of making different systems work together, social impact, and the reconsideration of past practices. More generally, the seminar is intended to provide a forum for advanced students in the School. Anyone interested in these topics is welcome to join in -- and to talk about their own work. This is a continuation of the previous Lynch/Buckland seminars.

Section: 1
F 3-5 PM | 107 South Hall

Information technology has been integrated into an array of complex interactions between individuals and the state. Often these technological changes are put forth as inevitable progress toward modernization and as value-neutral means for acting upon policies established through the political branch of government. However, the adoption or introduction of specific technology can obscure profound policy choices and options. Obscurity can arise due to barriers to transparency created by law, such as intellectual property rights asserted to prevent the analysis of software code used in electronic voting systems, due to a lack of necessary expertise to understand the ramifications of a technological shift within the public and private sector entities focused on the relevant policy issues, or, more fundamentally, due to shifts in technology that remove or shift the assumptions on which earlier policies were developed. As a result, the agency, the public, and the political branch of government may overlook the policy-implications in the choice of a new technology.

Through background readings from a range of disciplines and case studies this class will explore instances of discretion delegated to, or embedded in technology--unpacking the process, the substantive outcomes, and the responses from various communities--policy makers, academics, vendors--and disciplines. We will consider techniques for identifying policy issues in technical design, and delegations to technical experts through technology adoption. We will consider the risks and benefits of embedding value and policy choices through technical design versus the adoption of policies or procedures, and rigorously consider the hand-off among them. Topics will include the policy implications of standards, the process and implication of translating law into technological forms, governance implications of government adoption of technology, and government use of technology to regulate behavior and make decisions. 

Note: Before Fall 2016, this course was offered for 2 units.

Section: 2
TuTh 2-3:30 PM | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Deirdre Mulligan, Nick Doty

Individual & Group Study

This course is intended for graduate student instructors (GSIs) and is meant to be taken simultaneously with teaching as a GSI and to satisfy the Graduate Council's 300-level pedagogy course requirement. The practicum may include discussion, reading, preparation, and practical experience under faculty supervision in teaching, with a focus on topics within information management and systems.

Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Four hours of work per week per unit. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Does not count toward a degree.

Spring 2014: Info 375 will be offered for 2 units.

Th 12-2 PM | 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Paul Duguid