Information Course Schedule spring 2007

Core

This course is designed to be an introduction to the topics and issues associated with information and information technology and its role in society. Throughout the semester we will consider both the consequence and impact of technologies on social groups and on social interaction and how society defines and shapes the technologies that are produced. Students will be exposed to a broad range of applied and practical problems, theoretical issues, as well as methods used in social scientific analysis. The four sections of the course are: 1) theories of technology in society, 2) information technology in workplaces 3) automation vs. humans, and 4) networked sociability.

8 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week.

TuTh 12:30-2 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Coye Cheshire

This course uses examples from various commercial domains — retail, health, credit, entertainment, social media, and biosensing/quantified self — to explore legal and ethical issues including freedom of expression, privacy, research ethics, consumer protection, information and cybersecurity, and copyright. The class emphasizes how existing legal and policy frameworks constrain, inform, and enable the architecture, interfaces, data practices, and consumer facing policies and documentation of such offerings; and, fosters reflection on the ethical impact of information and communication technologies and the role of information professionals in legal and ethical work.

7 weeks - 4 hours of lecture per week.

M 2-4 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Pamela Samuelson

Three hours of lecture per week for seven and one-half weeks. Letter grading only. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor required for nonmajors. Systems and project management, focusing on the process of information systems analysis and design. Includes such topics as systems analysis, process analysis, cost and statistical analysis, accounting and budgeting, and planning.

TuTh 10:30-12 (Jan 18 – Mar 8) — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Yale Braunstein

As information becomes increasingly strategic for all organizations, technology professionals must also develop the core business skills required to build personal brand, expand influence, build high-quality relationships, and deliver on critical enterprise projects. Using a combination of business and academic readings, case discussions and guest speakers, this course will explore a series of critical business topics that apply to both start-up and Fortune 500 enterprises. Subjects include: communication and presentation skills, software and product development methodologies, negotiation skills, employee engagement, organizational structures and career paths, successful interviewing, and CV preparation.

W 2-4 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Michael Schaffer

General

Three hours of lecture per week. The role of information and information technology in organizations and society. Topics include societal needs and demands, sociology of knowledge and science, diffusion of knowledge and technology, information seeking and use, information and culture, and technology and culture.

M 1-4 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Nancy Van House
Three hours of lecture per week. User interface design and human-computer interaction. Examination of alternative design. Tools and methods for design and development. Human computer interaction. Methods for measuring and evaluating interface quality.
TuTh 9-10:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst
Three hours of lecture per week. Factors strongly impacting the success of new computing and communications products and services (based on underlying technologies such as electronics and software) in commercial applications. Technology trends and limits, economics, standardization, intellectual property, government policy, and industrial organizations. Strategies to manage the design and marketing of successful products and services.
MW 10:30-12 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Hal Varian
Three hours of seminar per week. Prerequisites: City and Regional Planning 220 or consent of instructor. Intermediate to advanced course focusing on theory and empirical evidence for regional growth and development, using reading and discussion. Also listed as City and Regional Planning C227.
Th 5-8 — 214B Wurster
Instructor(s): Edmund Egan

Three hours of lecture per week. The measurement and analysis of the role information plays in the economy and of the resources devoted to production, distribution, and consumption of information. Economic analysis of the information industry. Macroeconomics of information.

TuTh 2-3:30 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Yale Braunstein
Info 235. Cyberlaw (3 units)

Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to legal issues in information management, antitrust, contract management, international law including intellectual property, trans-border data flow, privacy, libel, and constitutional rights.

Th 3:30-6:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jason Schultz

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 202 or consent of instructor. Theories and methods for searching and retrieval of text and bibliographic information. Analysis of relevance, utility. Statistical and linguistic methods for automatic indexing and classification. Boolean and probabilistic approaches to indexing, query formulation, and output ranking. Filtering methods. Measures of retrieval effectiveness and retrieval experimentation methodology.

TuTh 10:30-12 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Ray Larson

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 202: Information Organization and Retrieval. This course introduces the discipline of Document Engineering: specifying, designing, and deploying electronic documents and information repositories that enable document-centric applications. These applications include web services, virtual enterprises, information supply chains, single-source publishing, and syndication in domains as diverse as healthcare, education, e-commerce, and e-government.

MW 9-10:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Robert Glushko

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 202 or consent of instructor. Standards and practices for organization and discription of bibliographic, textual, and non textual collections. Design, selection, maintenance and evaluation of cataloging, classification, indexing and thesaurus systems for specific settings. Codes, formats and standards for data representation and transfer of data.

WF 10:30-12 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Ray Larson

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 202, 203 or consent of instructor. Concepts and methods of design, management, creation, and evaluation of multimedia information systems. Theory and practice of digital media production, reception, organization, retrieval, and reuse. Review of applicable digital technology with special emphasis on digital video. Course will involve group projects in the design and development of digital media systems and applications.

Th 3:30-6:30 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Michael Smith

Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to many different types of quantitative research methods, with an emphasis on linking quantitative statistical techniques to real-world research methods. Introductory and intermediate topics include: defining research problems, theory testing, causal inference, probability and univariate statistics. Research design and methodology topics include: primary/secondary survey data analysis, experimental designs, and coding qualitative data for quantitative analysis. No prerequisites, though an introductory course in statistics is recommended.

TuTh 2-3:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Coye Cheshire
Three hours of lecture per week. What role can information and communications technologies play in transforming lives in developing economies? This interdisciplinary course positions recent public and private sector initiatives in the context of postwar development theory and practice, and surveys methods of evaluating projects that either develop new technologies such as wireless communications and low-cost computing, or that apply new technologies to areas such as healthcare, government, microfinance, and literacy.
TuTh 3:30-5:00 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): AnnaLee Saxenian

Special Topics

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 20
M 4-6 (Mar 5 – May 7) — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kimiko Ryokai

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 6
MW 4-5:30 — C125 Cheit
Instructor(s): Andrew Isaacs

Weekly lecture by outside guests on topics relevant to students interested in Services Science, Management and Engineering. Grade or pass fail - may not be repeated for credit.

Section 16
Tu 5-6 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Robert Glushko, Erik Wilde

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 1
M 3-4:30 (alternate weeks starting Jan 29) — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Eric Brewer, Isha Ray, AnnaLee Saxenian

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 12
W 2-4 — C110 Cheit
Instructor(s): Jackson Grantham

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 13
Tu 2-4 — 51 Evans Hall
Instructor(s): David Dornfeld, Edward Quevedo

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 19
TuTh 9-10:30 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Erik Wilde

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 9
Tu 6-9 — C110 Cheit
Instructor(s): Reza Moazzami

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 4
MW 12:30-2 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Raymond Yee

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 10
Tu 11-2 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Hugh Taylor

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 1
W 1-4 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Daniel Greenstein

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 17
Tu 3:30-5 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 5
Th 2-4 — F320 Haas
Instructor(s): Trudy Kehret-Ward

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 3
TuTh 2-3:30 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Nancy Van House

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 7
Tu 2-4 — F320 Haas
Instructor(s): Larry Lasky

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 21
M 4-5 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Deirdre Mulligan

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 11
MW 11-12:30 — C220 Cheit
Instructor(s): Henry Chesbrough

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 14
TuTh 11-12:30 — C220 Cheit
Instructor(s): Thomas Marschak

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 8
Tu 6-9:30 — C230 Cheit
Instructor(s): Henry Chesbrough

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 15
Tu 4-6 — C220 Cheit
Instructor(s): Christine Rosen, Andrew Isaacs

Seminar

One hour colloquium per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Ph.D. standing in the School of Information. Colloquia, discussion, and readings designed to introduce students to the range of interests of the school.

M 12-1:30 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Paul Duguid, AnnaLee Saxenian

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 2
M 4-6 (Jan-Feb) / M 6-8 (Mar-May) — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Coye Cheshire

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 1
F 3-5 — 107 South Hall