Information Course Schedule spring 2011

Lower Division Courses

Inspired by projects in the Open Education movement such as the University of Michigan's Open.Michigan, MIT's OpenCourseWare and Berkeley's Webcast program, Digital Berkeley seeks to connect students directly to the creation and dissemination of Berkeley course materials. The point of Digital Berkeley is to have students take materials from a Berkeley class, consult the professor(s)/ lecturer(s)/facilitator(s) and turn those materials into legal, digital, accessible, usable, Open Educational Resources (OER).

While the long term goal for this class is to establish an open, free repository for Berkeley course materials in the form of OER, the short term goal is to connect students to the process of creating OER, and thus forge relationships that will help the project grow as a campus-wide service.

This is a student-initiated group study course (DE-Cal). Please contact the student coordinator(s) for specific questions.

Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.

This course is also offered as Information 198 for upper-division undergraduates

(This course was offered for 2-3 units in Fall 2010.)

Section: 2
W 5-7 | 103 Wheeler
Instructor(s): Brian Carver Michael Pruess, Renee Schaaf
CCN:
42890

How can we critically think about emergent phenomena of the Internet? Is the Internet a democratic medium for political action (a "networked public sphere") or a surveillance apparatus of centralized control? Who has access to digital information and what techniques are used to make information artificially scarce? How do trade group lawsuits against digital "piracy" affect a generation's perception of the law? Should we look at the growing sphere of copyright as a public interest problem, or celebrate the expansion of creators' rights? Can free software thrive independently from ideological backing? Why are peer production communities like Wikipedia and Linux affected by extreme gender disparity?

In this course, we will examine the societal implications of computer networks from critical and technical perspectives. We will collectively engage with issues of intellectual property, access to information, privacy, freedom of speech, representation, and peer production. We will be discussing provocative texts and media, doing hands-on exploration of emerging technologies, and practicing ethnographic fieldwork in online communities. We will also offer opportunities for field trips and guest speakers to provide us with different perspectives. Additionally, students will engage in a semester-long collaborative project in a flexible format.

This is a student-initiated group study course (DE-Cal). Please contact the student coordinator(s) for specific questions.

Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.

Section: 1
Tu 5-6:30 | 185 Barrows
Instructor(s): Paul Duguid Patrick Berger, Max Klein
CCN:
42502

Upper Division Courses

According to conventional wisdom, the “information age” began just a few decades ago and promptly superseded everything that went before it. But the issues we are wrestling with now—questions about piracy, privacy, trust, “information overload,” and the replacement of old media by new—all have their roots in the informational cultures of earlier periods. In this class we will take a long view of the development of these cultures and technologies, from the earliest cave painting and writing systems to the advent of print, photography and the telegraph to the emergence of the computer and Internet and the world of Twitter, Pinterest and beyond. In every instance, be focused on the chicken-and-egg questions of technological determinism: how do technological developments affect society and vice-versa?

TuTh 2-3:30 | 155 Kroeber
Instructor(s): Geoffrey Nunberg, Paul Duguid
CCN:
42503

This course focuses on understanding the Web as an information system, and how to use it for information management for personal and shared information. The Web is an open and constantly evolving system which can make it hard to understand how the different parts of the landscape fit together. This course provides students with an overview of the Web as a whole, and how the individual parts it together. We briefly look at topics such as Web design and Web programming, but this course is not exclusively designed to teach HTML or JavaScript. Instead, we look at the bigger picture and how and when to use these and other technologies.

The Web already is and will remain a central part in many information-related activities for a long time to come, and this course provides students with the understanding and skills to better navigate and use the landscape of Web information (for example, Wikipedia), Web technologies (for example, HTML, CSS, and JavaScript), Web tools (for example, delicious and Yahoo pipes), and common Web patterns (for example, mashups).

MW 3-4 (Lab 1: F 11-12, 205 South Hall or Lab 2: F 2-3. 202 South Hall | 88 Dwinelle
Instructor(s): Dilan Mahendran, Erik Wilde

This course will encourage students to think broadly about the interplay between technological systems, social processes, economic activities, and political contingencies in efforts to alleviate poverty. Students will come to understand poverty not only in terms of high-level indicators, but from a ground-level perspective as ‘the poor’ experience and describe it for themselves. The role played by individuals and societies of the developing world as active agents in processes of technology adoption and use will be a central theme. Technologies connection to socio-economic development efforts will be put into historical context by exposing students to several phases of intensive interest including the ‘green revolution,’ the push towards industrialization, the ‘appropriate technologies’ movement, and more recent interest in digital technologies.

Introductory material for the course will challenge students to think about exactly how ‘technology’ is defined and about the wide variation amongst devices/systems covered by the term. Course topics will be explored through a series of case studies that will be supplemented by cross-disciplinary readings. The use of illustrative case studies will make the course accessible to undergraduates with diverse disciplinary backgrounds. In our discussion of ‘information technologies’ we will explore not only key form factors such as computers, the Internet, and mobile phones, but also their incorporation into broader practices such as micro-business and agriculture.

TuTh 11-12:30 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jenna Burrell
CCN:
42518

Inspired by projects in the Open Education movement such as the University of Michigan's Open.Michigan, MIT's OpenCourseWare and Berkeley's Webcast program, Digital Berkeley seeks to connect students directly to the creation and dissemination of Berkeley course materials. The point of Digital Berkeley is to have students take materials from a Berkeley class, consult the professor(s)/ lecturer(s)/facilitator(s) and turn those materials into legal, digital, accessible, usable, Open Educational Resources (OER).

While the long term goal for this class is to establish an open, free repository for Berkeley course materials in the form of OER, the short term goal is to connect students to the process of creating OER, and thus forge relationships that will help the project grow as a campus-wide service.

This is a student-initiated group study course (DE-Cal). Please contact the student coordinator(s) for specific questions.

Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.

This course is also offered as Information 98 for lower-division undergraduates

(This course was offered for 2-3 units in Fall 2010.)

Section: 2
W 5-7 | 103 Wheeler
Instructor(s): Brian Carver Michael Pruess, Renee Schaaf
CCN:
42523

How can we critically think about emergent phenomena of the Internet? Is the Internet a democratic medium for political action (a "networked public sphere") or a surveillance apparatus of centralized control? Who has access to digital information and what techniques are used to make information artificially scarce? How do trade group lawsuits against digital "piracy" affect a generation's perception of the law? Should we look at the growing sphere of copyright as a public interest problem, or celebrate the expansion of creators' rights? Can free software thrive independently from ideological backing? Why are peer production communities like Wikipedia and Linux affected by extreme gender disparity?

In this course, we will examine the societal implications of computer networks from critical and technical perspectives. We will collectively engage with issues of intellectual property, access to information, privacy, freedom of speech, representation, and peer production. We will be discussing provocative texts and media, doing hands-on exploration of emerging technologies, and practicing ethnographic fieldwork in online communities. We will also offer opportunities for field trips and guest speakers to provide us with different perspectives. Additionally, students will engage in a semester-long collaborative project in a flexible format.

This is a student-initiated group study course (DE-Cal). Please contact the student coordinator(s) for specific questions.

Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.

Section: 1
Tu 5-6:30 | 185 Barrows
Instructor(s): Paul Duguid Max Klein
CCN:
42521

Core Courses

This course is designed to be an introduction to the topics and issues associated with the study of information and information technology, from a social science perspective. As a result, this course will continuously introduce students to applied and practical problems, theoretical issues, as well as methods for answering different types of questions.

The following three questions will guide the material throughout the course: 1) Why do social scientists study information and information technology, 2) What are some of the key topics and issues that are studied, and 3) How do we study these issues? As we work our way through many different topics and problems in information, we will focus on various levels of analysis. This includes the micro (i.e., interpersonal relationships and information in small groups) to the macro level (i.e., organizational and institutional problems of information). By the end of the course, all students will be familiar with the social science approach to information and information technology, as well as many of the key problems and the methods used to solve these problems. This knowledge is essential to having a well-rounded understanding of information issues in professional environments.

NOTE: Before Fall 2016, this course was named Social and Organizational Issues of Information. The course was offered for 3 units in Spring 2010 and Spring 2011.

TuTh 12:30-2 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Coye Cheshire
CCN:
42578

Three hours of lecture per week. Law is one of a number of policies that mediates the tension between free flow and restrictions on the flow of information. This course introduces students to copyright and other forms of legal protection for databases, licensing of information, consumer protection, liability for insecure systems and defective information, privacy, and national and international information policy.

NOTE: Before Fall 2010, this course was offered for 2 units.

MW 2-3:30 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Deirdre Mulligan
CCN:
42581

Delivering value to enterprises and ensuring long-term career success requires much more than pure technology skills. As information becomes increasingly strategic for all organizations, technology professionals must also develop the core business skills required to build personal brand, expand influence, build high-quality relationships, and deliver on critical enterprise projects.

Using a combination of business and academic readings, case discussions and guest speakers, this course will explore a series of critical business topics that apply both to start-up and Fortune 500 enterprises. Subjects to be explored include: communication and presentation skills, software and product development methodologies, negotiation skills, employee engagement, organizational structures and career paths, successful interviewing and CV preparation.

Note: This course is being offered on an S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) basis and will involve reviewing and presenting updates on the School of Information final project.

Until 2015, this course was titled “Professional Skills Workshop.”

F 10-12 | 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Michael Schaffer
CCN:
42584

General Courses

Three hours of lecture per week. User interface design and human-computer interaction. Examination of alternative design. Tools and methods for design and development. Human- computer interaction. Methods for measuring and evaluating interface quality.

This course covers the design, prototyping, and evaluation of user interfaces to computers which is often called Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). It is loosely based on course CS1 described in the ACM SIGCHI Curricula for Human-Computer Interaction (Association for Computing Machinery, 1992).

HCI covers many topics including:

  1. Human capabilities (e.g., visual and auditory perception, memory, mental models, and interface metaphors);
  2. Interface technology (e.g., input and output devices, interaction styles, and common interface paradigms); and,
  3. Interface design methods (e.g., user-centered design, prototyping, and design principles and rules), and interface evaluation (e.g., software logging, user observation, benchmarks and experiments).

This material is covered through lectures, reading, discussions, homework assignments, and a course project. This course differs from CS 160 primarily in two ways:

  1. There is an emphasis on interfaces for information technology applications; and,
  2. There is less emphasis on programming and system development, although some simple prototyping (for example, in visual basic or using JAVA GUI development tools) may be required. (CS 160 has a big programming project.)
TuTh 3:30-5 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Tapan Parikh
CCN:
42590

“Information” is a versatile word. It’s the name we attach to the age we live in, to and the technologies that define it, to the society and economy that they give rise to, and to the "revolution" that these technologies launch. It characterizes a variety of professions, activities, and social conditions (information architect, CIO, information overload, information haves and have-nots, information warfare), and not incidentally the new faculties that take “information” as their unifying focus. The word figures as a theoretical or technical term in a number of disciplines, including AI, computer science, philosophy, psychology, linguistics, economics, political science and information theory. In short, the word stands (along with its sister “data”) for a welter of social, technological and intellectual connections that seem to define a large swath of modern life.

In this class, we will not be trying to define “information” or “data” (though we’ll look at some attempts to do so). Rather we want to take the word as a point of entry to explore the connections and ideologies that it evokes. Why do people assume, for example, that the bits and bytes sitting on their hard drives are the same as the stuff that creates social revolutions and whose free exchange is necessary to the health of democratic society? (Would we make those connections if we didn’t use the word “information” to describe them?) How are the notions of information deployed by management science or artificial intelligence connected to the information theory developed by Shannon?

We’ll be taking on these questions by discussing readings both from historical periods and from a range of disciplines, focusing on the some of notions (such as “information,” “data,” “platform,” “technology,” “knowledge”) that seem to connect them.

TuTh 9:30-11 | 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Geoffrey Nunberg, Paul Duguid
CCN:
42593

This course examines information from an economic perspective. We will introduce a range of seminal theories that describe how information is created, shared, and valued. Our focus covers both the role of information in the general economy, as well as the specific behavior of information markets. Topics will include information technology, knowledge production, markets with hidden information, digital goods, and networks. While this is a theoretical course, the tools and insights it provides may benefit any student navigating issues in the information economy.

TuTh 11-12:30 | 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Yale Braunstein
CCN:
42599

Three hours of lecture per week. The emergence of global digital networks, such as the Internet, and digital technologies that enhance human abilities to access, store, manipulate, and transmit vast amounts of information has brought with it a host of new legal issues that lawyers preparing to practice in the 21st century will need to understand and address. Although many are trying to "map" existing legal concepts onto problems arising in cyberspace, it is becoming increasingly evident that this strategy sometimes doesn't work. In some cases, it is necessary to go back to first principles to understand how to accomplish the purposes of existing law in digital networked environments. The course will explore specific problems in applying law to cyberspace in areas such as intellectual property, privacy, content control, and the bounds of jurisdiction. Students with familiarity with the Internet and its resources or with backgrounds in some of the substantive fields explored in this course are especially welcome, but there are no formal prerequisites. Grades for the course will be based either on a series of short papers or on a supervised term paper.

Note: This course is cross-listed with Law 276.1.

MW 11-12:30 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Brian Carver
CCN:
42602

Three hours of lecture per week. Theories and methods for searching and retrieval of text and bibliographic information. Analysis of relevance and utility. Statistical and linguistic methods for automatic indexing and classification. Boolean and probabilistic approaches to indexing, query formulation, and output ranking. Filtering methods. Measures of retrieval effectiveness and retrieval experimentation methodology.

This course is intended to prepare you to understand the underlying theories and algorithms of advanced information retrieval systems and to introduce the methodology for the design and evaluation of information retrieval systems. The course will introduce you to the major types of information retrieval systems, the different theoretical foundations underlying these systems, and the methods and measures that can be used to evaluate them. The course will focus on the both the theoretical aspects of information retrieval design and evaluation, and will also consider the practical aspects of how these theories have been implemented in actual systems. These topics will be examined through readings, discussion, hands-on experience using various information retrieval systems, and through participation in evaluation of different retrieval algorithms on various test collections. The prerequisite for the course is INFOSYS 202, though this may be waived with the consent of instructor. A good familiarity with computers and programming is highly desirable.

MW 11-12:30 | 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Ray Larson
CCN:
42605

This course will be an introduction into the past, present, and future of the theory and practice of multimedia information systems. Through readings in semiotics, film and media theory, and the history and theory of computation and computational media, we will examine the development and differentiation of media into distinct technologies and data flows, as well as their subsequent mixing and re-mixing.

We will establish a conceptual and historical foundation to design, assess, and critique multimedia information systems. We will explore the theory and methods of the multimedia production cycle, including the editing, storage, retrieval, management, and distribution of digital media. Students will apply their theoretical knowledge in working hands-on to learn video and audio production practices

MWF 1-2 | 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Alex Braunstein
CCN:
42607

This course offers a multidisciplinary inquiry into the technology, business, economics, and public-policy of computer networks and distributed applications. We will cover the technical foundations of computer networks, including: Internet architecture, network technologies and protocols (e.g., 802.*, TCP/IP, HTTP), routing algorithms and policies, network applications (e.g., p2p overlays, VoIP), emerging network technologies, and network security. Tightly integrated will be coverage on the business, economics and policy of networking, including: economic characteristics of networks, network industry structure and ISP competition, wireless spectrum auction, network neutrality, and incentive-centered design of networks and applications.

TuTh 2-3:30 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): John Chuang
CCN:
42611

This course will explore the theory and practice of Tangible User Interfaces, a new approach to HCI which focuses on the physical interaction with computational media. The topics covered in the course include:

  • Theoretical framework of Tangible User Interfaces
  • Design examples of Tangible User Interfaces
  • Enabling technologies for Tangible User Interfaces

Students will design and develop experimental Tangible User Interfaces, applications, underlying technologies, and theories using concept sketches, posters, physical mockups, working prototypes, and a final project report. The course will have 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of laboratory per week.

Note:  Previously listed as Info 290: Theory and Practice of Tangible User Interfaces. Students who completed INFO 290 section 4 in Fall 2008 will receive no credit for Info 262.

This course is cross-listed as New Media C262.

MW 11-12:30 (Lab: M 2-3) | 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kimiko Ryokai
CCN:
42614

This seminar reviews current literature and debates regarding Information and Communication Technologies and Development (ICTD). This is an interdisciplinary and practice-oriented field that draws on insights from economics, sociology, engineering, computer science, management, public health, etc.

M 2-5 | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Isha Ray, Kentaro Toyama
CCN:
42617

Special Topics Courses

The purpose of this course is to provide an online marketing and advertising, healthcare, and service center industry context for data mining, information extraction, and analytics, as an important element for student work in information systems and analytics.

Specifically, we hope to:

  • Provide an overview of issues and trends which will shape the need for and structures of data mining, information extraction, and analytics in business information systems within online marketing and ads, healthcare, and service centers.
  • Identify and explore key topics, followed by the development of analytic methods, for data mining, analytics, and information extraction, in these contexts

We will have industry speakers and industry projects as well, to provide real-world perspective and real-world engagement.

This course is being offered for one to three units; instructor approval is required to take this course for more than one unit.

Section: 15
W 2-4 | 254 Sutardja Dai Hall
CCN:
42893

This course will be quite different from typical courses. As a class we will explore emerging paradigms in management. Management is changing quite a bit these days. New ways of managing are emerging; some are driven by advances in information technology, while others are influenced by broader societal and demographic trends. In this course, we will use an ongoing research project into “the world’s best-performing companies” to explore emerging paradigms in three areas: (1) new leadership models (distributed, collaborative); (2) new business models that combine profit and environmental/societal issues (“doing well and doing good”); and (3) workplace innovations (networked, work/life balance). This combination of leadership-business model-workplace innovations amounts to new kinds of companies. The course will not use standard lectures: students and the professor will together discuss and explore issues and company cases. The course is not a theory or academic research course but an applied management course.

Section: 5
F 9-12 | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Morten Hansen
CCN:
42626

The ICTD group seminar will discuss topics of current interest in the emerging multidisciplinary field of Information and Communications Technologies and Development, or ICTD. Each semester will be focused on a particular topic or set of topics, under the direction of appropriate faculty from the I School's ICTD group. The course content will consist of paper discussions, invited lectures from both within and outside the class and a some relatively short written assignments. Students will also be responsible for presenting during at least on class session, either on their own research, ideas or on a selected set of papers relevant to the semester's chosen topic.

Section: 12
F 12-1 | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jenna Burrell, Tapan Parikh
CCN:
42887

The purpose of this course is to provide a health care industry context for information systems as an important element for student work in
systems design and evaluation. Specifically, I hope to:

  • Provide an overview of issues and trends which will shape the need for and structures of information systems within health care:demographic, epidemiological, social and technologic
  • Identity and explore key topics in health care information systems: background, issues, examples, implications for future development

 

NOTE:
This course was previously offered as Info 290A: Information Systems and Health Care. May not be taken for credit if student has previously taken Info 290A: Information Systems and Health Care.

(In Spring 2011, this course was offered for 1–2 units.)

Section: 4
Tu 3:30-5:30 (January 18 - March 8) | 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Steven DeMello
CCN:
42625

The School of Information is fundamentally about integrating knowledge from various disciplines in order to develop great information solutions for the world. This 5-week workshop will use a case to do that — a previous student master's project. It will be analyzed and "re-designed" from different angles, with relevant faculty at each stage. The project case will most likely be a iPhone/Internet service solution developed for the healthcare industry.

5 Sessions and 6 Perspectives (in no particular order):

  1. User needs assessment: What is the need or "painpoint" addressed? How do you find out? (Parikh)
  2. Service design: What is the overarching design of the service/solution? Eco-system: how does a solution best link to external partners and data sources? (Glushko)
  3. System architecture: What is the best way to design the system architecture? (Wilde)
  4. Interaction design: What are the critical things to get right for users? (Parikh)
  5. Legal: Security, privacy, IP: How do you secure sensitive data? What are the IP issues? (Mulligan, Carver)
  6. Business strategy and organization: What are possible business models? What's the competition? How do you get this adopted? (Hansen)

Principal organizer: Morten Hansen

Workshop dates:
2 hours on Monday from 9 am to 11 am. January 24, January 31, February 7, February 14, February 28, March 7 and March 14.

Section: 11
M 9-11 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Various
CCN:
42634

News, online, movies, advertising, television, mobile, videogames, music, books, social media — all part of the industry of informing and entertaining, and all being revolutionized. In this course we will do a quick overview of the media business — from startups to global conglomerates.

We will address a wide range of topics: the economics of media organizations (and industries), their organizational structures, cultures, brands, and approaches.

Some of the questions we'll discuss:

  • ­How do traditional media address changing technologies?
  • ­How is the media business driven by metrics and data? How is it driven by artistic creativity?
  • ­Are media companies too big? Are they too small?

Students will present strategies for media companies, hear from guest speakers, and discuss the transformations happening in media. Students should expect to have significant input into the companies and topics we discuss.

We will make every attempt to avoid predictions about the future; we might occasionally succeed.

Note: This course is cross-listed in the Haas School of Business.

Section: 10
M 4-6 (February 28 - April 25) | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Roy Bahat
CCN:
42632

We have traditionally analyzed collections of information or things using categories like libraries, museums, archives, content or knowledge management systems, and data repositories. The concept of an "organizing system" complements this categorical view with a dimensional perspective that sees these categories as sets of "design patterns" that reflect typical answers to questions about what is being organized, why, when, how much, who is doing the organizing, and how services are provided to interact with the organizing system. These dimensions frame trade-offs and constraints about the content, policies, and implementation of organizing systems. The primary goal of this course is to use these design dimensions to better understand traditional design patterns and their consequences, and to identify useful new ones.

For example, the "thingness," uniqueness, persistence, useful lifetime, mashability, and intended uses and users of the content of an organizing system jointly determine how it is implemented and operated. We will examine how these design influences intersect, and consider what alternative designs would look like if some of these content and policy choices were to change. Furthermore, in many domains the Web has become the default implementation of organizing systems interfaces, yet we don’t critically examine the implications this should have on the system itself. So we will study how Web architecture – or the architectures and constraints implied by other metamodels and architectures such as "Linked data" or "WS-* interfaces" – influence decisions about content granularity and structure, how identity and provenance are supported, the kinds of interactions and services the organizing system allows, and so on.

Toward the end of the semester we will analyze some case studies and proposed architectures for health informatics infrastructures or for exposing government data in general to test and consolidate the new concepts of the course.

Section: 6
Tu 11-12:30 | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Erik Wilde, Robert Glushko
CCN:
42628

In this lab course, students will engage in hands-on examinations of the policy implications of technical standards currently under consideration, the technical andpolicy impacts of legislation before state and federal government, and ongoing efforts to address policy implications of the introduction of new technology into government processes. Through research, analysis and direct participation in standards setting and other processes, students will gain experience applying law and policy theory to real world cases.

The course will begin with regular meetings for discussion of various standard setting bodies and their practices and processes, the history and current status of legal doctrine and the underlying theory of technology and delegation. The remainder of the course will be project based: students may bring their own projects or contribute to ongoing collaborations with organizations such as the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS), the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) and the Digital Due Process Coalition (ddp); or participate in research related to the Smart Grid, eVoting, net neutrality and other complicated issues facing policymakers.

The exact focus of projects will depend on the interests and skills of participating students and faculty, but may include: empirical research on the use and abuse of Web standards; prototype implementations of proposed value-focused technologies; analysis of proposed Electronic Communications Privacy Act reforms; qualitative research on the policy implications of voting system changes; and, ethnographic studies of technical standards organizations.

This course has no technical or law/policy pre-requisites. Class will meet regularly on Thursday afternoons and occasionally for project meetings on Tuesday afternoons.

(Students who wish to be fully participating members in a technical standards body may take an additional unit with the instructors' permission.)

Section: 2
Th 2-3:30 (occasional project meetings Tu 2-3:30) | 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Deirdre Mulligan
CCN:
42622

Visual media are central to much of what we do in the I School, as well as other professions and research domains. Easy and low-cost video and still cameras, cameraphones, and audio recording devices make it easy to record such things as activity and interviews. Reports and presentations, face-to-face and distant, online and off, rely heavily on the visual. In design work, media are used both to inform design and to present design concepts and use scenarios.

However, our knowledge about how to effectively make, use, summarize, and present these media trails far behind our ability to create hours and gigabytes of content.

In this seminar, we will address both theoretical and practical issues of capturing video, audio, and still images and creating narratives and presentations. We will read from such areas as visual anthropology and visual studies; and we will get hands-on experience creating and editing our own media.
This is not a technical course; nor is it a media production how-to. But we will cover some of the basics of making and editing media. Both theory and hands-on practice are needed to really delve into this domain.

No prior experience is necessary, but students who are already grappling with visual (and audio) media will find this course especially useful.

This course is appropriate for master's and Ph.D. students from the I School and other disciplines. 

It would be an excellent companion to I214, User Experience Research, or to I272, Qualitative Research Methods for Information Systems and Management, or equivalents, although there are no prerequisites.

For second year I School master's students, we'll pay special attention to visual media for final projects and presentations.

Section: 1
W 9-12 | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Nancy Van House
CCN:
42620

Seminars & Colloquia

One hour colloquium per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Colloquia, discussion, and readings are designed to introduce students to the range of interests of the school.

M 12:30-2 | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Nancy Van House
CCN:
42635

The seminar explores selected advanced topics relating to 'digital libraries' with special emphasis on:

  • Access to networked resources
  • Use of two or more resources in conjunction
  • Combined use of two or more retrieval systems (e.g. use of pre- or post-processing to enhance the capabilities)
  • The redesign of library services

It is expected that these issues will require attention to a number of questions about the nature of information retrieval processes, the feasibility of not-yet-conventional techniques, techniques of making different systems work together, social impact, and the reconsideration of past practices. More generally, the seminar is intended to provide a forum for advanced students in the School. Anyone interested in these topics is welcome to join in — and to talk about their own work. This is a continuation of the previous Lynch/Buckland seminars.

Section: 1
F 3-5 | 107 South Hall
CCN:
42638