Information Course Schedule spring 2013

Lower-Division

How can we critically think about emergent phenomena of the Internet? Is the Internet a democratic medium for political action (a "networked public sphere") or a surveillance apparatus of centralized control? Who has access to digital information and what techniques are used to make information artificially scarce? How do trade group lawsuits against digital "piracy" affect a generation's perception of the law? Should we look at the growing sphere of copyright as a public interest problem, or celebrate the expansion of creators' rights? Can free software thrive independently from ideological backing? Why are peer production communities like Wikipedia and Linux affected by extreme gender disparity?

In this course, we will examine the societal implications of computer networks from critical and technical perspectives. We will collectively engage with issues of intellectual property, access to information, privacy, freedom of speech, representation, and peer production. We will be discussing provocative texts and media, doing hands-on exploration of emerging technologies, and practicing ethnographic fieldwork in online communities. We will also offer opportunities for field trips and guest speakers to provide us with different perspectives. Additionally, students will engage in a semester-long collaborative project in a flexible format.

This is a student-initiated group study course (DE-Cal). Please contact the student coordinator(s) for specific questions.

Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.

Section 1
Tu 5-6:30 — 136 Barrows
Instructor(s): Paul Duguid Angelica Tavella

Upper-Division

Surveying history through the lens of information and information through the lens of history, this course looks across time to consider what might distinguish ours as “the information age” and what that description implies about the role of “information technology” across time. We will select moments in societies’ development of information production, circulation, consumption, and storage from the earliest writing and numbering systems to the world of Social Media. In every instance, we’ll be concerned with what and when, but also with how and why. Throughout we will keep returning to questions about how information-technological developments affect society and vice versa?

TuTh 9:30-11:00 — 155 Kroeber
Instructor(s): Geoffrey Nunberg, Paul Duguid

This class is a weekly, two hour, hands-on workshop for user interface prototyping. The goal is to introduce students to some of the ways that user interface prototypes are created and used. Most weeks will feature a different guest speaker who will first talk about how they create and use prototypes and then lead the class in a workshop where the students create a prototype in a similar format. From traditional methods such as paper and pen to digital tools such as wireframing software, you will get broad exposure to a wide range of prototyping methods as well as experience presenting your work to others and learning techniques for constructive feedback and iteration.

Section 2
Tu 5-7 (January 22 - April 23) — 494 Wurster Hall

How can we critically think about emergent phenomena of the Internet? Is the Internet a democratic medium for political action (a "networked public sphere") or a surveillance apparatus of centralized control? Who has access to digital information and what techniques are used to make information artificially scarce? How do trade group lawsuits against digital "piracy" affect a generation's perception of the law? Should we look at the growing sphere of copyright as a public interest problem, or celebrate the expansion of creators' rights? Can free software thrive independently from ideological backing? Why are peer production communities like Wikipedia and Linux affected by extreme gender disparity?

In this course, we will examine the societal implications of computer networks from critical and technical perspectives. We will collectively engage with issues of intellectual property, access to information, privacy, freedom of speech, representation, and peer production. We will be discussing provocative texts and media, doing hands-on exploration of emerging technologies, and practicing ethnographic fieldwork in online communities. We will also offer opportunities for field trips and guest speakers to provide us with different perspectives. Additionally, students will engage in a semester-long collaborative project in a flexible format.

This is a student-initiated group study course (DE-Cal). Please contact the student coordinator(s) for specific questions.

Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.

Section 1
Tu 5-6:30 — 136 Barrows
Instructor(s): Paul Duguid Angelica Tavella

Graduate

This course is designed to be an introduction to the topics and issues associated with information and information technology and its role in society. Throughout the semester we will consider both the consequence and impact of technologies on social groups and on social interaction and how society defines and shapes the technologies that are produced. Students will be exposed to a broad range of applied and practical problems, theoretical issues, as well as methods used in social scientific analysis. The four sections of the course are: 1) theories of technology in society, 2) information technology in workplaces 3) automation vs. humans, and 4) networked sociability.

TuTh 11-12:30 — 170 Barrows
Instructor(s): Jenna Burrell

7 weeks - 4 hours of laboratory per week. This course introduces software skills used in building prototype scripts for applications in data science and information management. The course gives an overview of procedural programming, object-oriented programming, and functional programming techniques in the Python scripting language, together with an overview of fundamental data structures, associated algorithms, and asymptotic performance analysis. Students will watch a set of instructional videos covering material and will have four hours of laboratory-style course contact each week.

TuTh 9:30-11:00 (LAB: W 1-2) — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Tapan Parikh

As information becomes increasingly strategic for all organizations, technology professionals must also develop the core business skills required to build personal brand, expand influence, build high-quality relationships, and deliver on critical enterprise projects. Using a combination of business and academic readings, case discussions and guest speakers, this course will explore a series of critical business topics that apply to both start-up and Fortune 500 enterprises. Subjects include: communication and presentation skills, software and product development methodologies, negotiation skills, employee engagement, organizational structures and career paths, successful interviewing, and CV preparation.

F 12:00 -2:00 — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Michael Schaffer

This course addresses concepts and methods of user experience research, from understanding and identifying needs, to evaluating concepts and designs, to assessing the usability of products and solutions. We emphasize methods of collecting and interpreting qualitative data about user activities, working both individually and in teams, and translating them into design decisions. Students gain hands-on practice with observation, interview, survey, focus groups, and expert review. Team activities and group work are required during class and for most assignments. Additional topics include research in enterprise, consulting, and startup organizations, lean/agile techniques, mobile research approaches, and strategies for communicating findings.

TuTh 12:30-2 — 210 South Hall

Three hours of lecture per week. This course covers the practical and theoretical issues associated with computer-mediated communication (CMC) systems (e.g., email, newsgroups, wikis, online games, etc.). We will focus on the analysis of CMC practices, the relationship between technology and behavior, and the design and implementation issues associated with constructing CMC systems. This course primarily takes a social scientific approach (including research from social psychology, economics, sociology, and communication).

W 9-12 — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Coye Cheshire

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. As it's generally used, "information" is a collection of notions, rather than a single coherent concept. In this course, we'll examine conceptions of information based in information theory, philosophy, social science, economics, and history. Issues include: How compatible are these conceptions; can we talk about "information" in the abstract? What work do these various notions play in discussions of literacy, intellectual property, advertising, and the political process? And where does this leave "information studies" and "the information society"?

TuTh 1-2:30 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Geoffrey Nunberg, Paul Duguid

This course focuses on the practice of leadership, collaboration, and people management in contemporary, distributed, information and technology-rich organizations. Not just for potential people managers, we start with the premise that a foundation in leadership, management, and collaboration is essential for individuals in all roles, at any stage of their career. To build this foundation we will take a hybrid approach, engaging literature from disciplines such as social psychology, management, and organizational behavior, as well as leveraging case studies and practical exercises. The course will place a special emphasis on understanding and reacting to social dynamics in workplace hierarchies and teams.

F 9-12 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Morten Hansen

Three hours of lecture per week. The measurement and analysis of the role information plays in the economy and of the resources devoted to production, distribution, and consumption of information. Economic analysis of the information industry. Macroeconomics of information.

TuTh 2-3:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Paul Laskowski
Info 235. Cyberlaw (3 units)

Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to legal issues in information management, antitrust, contract management, international law including intellectual property, trans-border data flow, privacy, libel, and constitutional rights.

MW 2-3:30 — 130 Boalt Hall

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 202 or consent of instructor. Theories and methods for searching and retrieval of text and bibliographic information. Analysis of relevance, utility. Statistical and linguistic methods for automatic indexing and classification. Boolean and probabilistic approaches to indexing, query formulation, and output ranking. Filtering methods. Measures of retrieval effectiveness and retrieval experimentation methodology.

MW 11-12:30 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Ray Larson

The design and presentation of digital information. Use of graphics, animation, sound, visualization software, and hypermedia in presenting information to the user. Methods of presenting complex information to enhance comprehension and analysis. Incorporation of visualization techniques into human-computer interfaces. Three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.

TuTh 3:30-5 — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Michael Porath

Students will receive no credit for C262 after taking 290 section 4. Three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week. This course explores the theory and practice of Tangible User Interfaces, a new approach to Human Computer Interaction that focuses on the physical interaction with computational media. The topics covered in the course include theoretical framework, design examples, enabling technologies, and evaluation of Tangible User Interfaces. Students will design and develop experimental Tangible User Interfaces using physical computing prototyping tools and write a final project report. Also listed as New Media C262.

MW 2-3:30 (Lab: M 3:30-4:30) — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kimiko Ryokai

In your present and future work, you will increasingly face what have been called “wicked problems.” They are volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous. Dealing with them requires new ways of thinking about issues and new ways of innovative leadership. This class focuses on having you learn about and practice some of the processes and tools — drawn from the fields of critical thinking, design thinking, systems thinking and creative problem solving — that will help you grapple with the “wicked problems” presented to you in school and beyond. Specifically, we’ll work with ways of collecting information to characterize a problem, framing and re-framing that problem, coming up with a range of solutions and then gathering feedback to assess those solutions. We’ll work in a “learn-by-doing” mode in five zones: observations, insights, ideas, solutions and stories and apply those processes and tools to designing and redesigning in real settings.

Section 3
F 9-12 — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Clark Kellogg

This is a hands on course that will address two major challenges associated with the current shift from text-based to e-books: making them more engaging and informative through use of the capabilities of the medium, and identifying and analyzing the issues surrounding the collaborative authoring and usage of e-books in an educational context.

Course may be repeated for credit, as new issues will be explored.

(In Fall 2012, this course was offered for 1 unit.)

Section 5
M 12-2 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Robert Glushko

This course will bring together students from the humanities who want to learn how technology can change how they do research, and students from information and computer science who want to help build the next generation of tools for humanities scholars, with a focus on analysis of written literature.

Students from each discipline will be expected to be open to learning from the other. The course will consist of readings and discussion of research papers as well as analysis and evaluation of existing tools. Students will be expected to contribute to the design, analysis, and/or evaluation of a new software tool for scholarly literature analysis.

Information and computer science students should have experience or backgrounds in some subset of database programming, XML design, graphic design, user interface design, information visualization, natural language processing, machine learning, data mining and/or statistical analysis as well as general programming skills.

Humanities students should have an open mind and a passion to learn about new techniques.

Open to graduate students in all fields and upper-division undergraduates by permission of instructor.

This course is also offered as Information 190. Proseminar in the Digital Humanities.

Section 2
M 9-12 — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 6
M 10:30-12:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Coye Cheshire

Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.  Two to six hours of lecture per week for seven and one-half weeks or one to four hours of lecture per week for 15 weeks.  Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor.  Specific topics hours, and credit may vary from section to section, year to year.

Section 7
F 2-5 — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jim Blomo

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 12
Th 1-2 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jenna Burrell

Kultima and Kuittinen (2011) characterize the gaming industry as follows: “As a hybrid of engineering and arts, the game industry seems to be essentially coupled with constant change, whether it is change within one project and game concept, change in personnel and company structures, change in production models and tools or business models, contents, platforms, and consumer base — the systematization and standardization of [game design] processes face the challenge of change.”

Given that designing games is such a dynamic process, this course will focus on deeper topics that inform the design of interesting, enjoyable games regardless of the latest trends. For example, consider the recent rise of “gamification” and its application to everything from the software test process to call center operations to exercise regimes. Before gamification, the buzzword among digital gaming researchers was “serious.” Everyone wanted to talk about “serious” games as opposed to “casual” games, which had been the hot topic only the year before. And prior to that, there was plenty of speculation about what might become the first truly popular massively multiplayer online game (MMOG). World of Warcraft concluded that discussion with a flourish by the end of 2006 when nearly 6 million players had subscribed to the game. That number nearly doubled by 2009, although as of July 2012 the game has 9.1 million subscribers.

This course does not teach any specific software tools for prototyping graphics engines, nor will you learn how to model characters in 3D or get your mobile app to the top of the best-seller list. Instead, this course is designed to help you understand the processes that underpin innovation and creativity, as well as the history and future of the digital gaming industry. By studying and experimenting with tools that will help you systematize your creative thoughts and innovative concepts, you will become a better game designer. Expect to learn a little bit about how creative thinking works, a little bit more about different development models in use within the digital gaming industry, and quite a lot about how to hone your creative ideas as tools to generate game designs and design ideas.

The course will be run in a colloquium style, which means you can expect a couple of readings each week that you and your peers will review and present to the rest of us. You will also get a taste for the intense pressures of game development cycles by working in teams on game ideas. You will complete this course with multiple portfolio pieces that highlight your ability to take a game concept from idea to prototype, collaborate with others in the process of developing that idea, reflect critically on your design processes, and harness your creative thinking.

Section 4
M 5-7 — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Alex Thayer

Course may be repeated for credit. One and one-half to two hours of lecture per week for eight weeks. Two hours of lecture per week for six weeks. Three hours of lecture per week for five weeks.

Section 1
Tu 3:30-5:30 (January 22 - March 12) — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Steven DeMello

Course may be repeated for credit. One and one-half to two hours of lecture per week for eight weeks. Two hours of lecture per week for six weeks. Three hours of lecture per week for five weeks.

Section 2
M 4-6 (January 28 - March 18) — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Roy Bahat

Every business depends on information — about customers, competitors, trends, performance, etc. Entire curricula have been focused on the technological, systems, strategic, and management challenges associated with that dependency. This course, however, looks at a different intersection between information and business. Specifically, it will explore how entrepreneurs across the world are developing ventures fundamentally centered on new and emerging information technologies and the business models and strategies they make possible. These include not only the Googles, Amazons, and Facebooks of the world, but also ventures like Comat and Samasource. In some cases, these are efforts on the proverbial cutting edge of technology; more often they involve creative application and/or integration of existing information technologies in innovative ways.

We will first examine the key elements of business models and the entrepreneurial process, before looking in more detail at a variety of ventures leveraging information-based technologies and strategies in an array of markets. Using of mix of case-study discussion, short lectures, and focused conversations with active entrepreneurs, this will be a highly interactive and collaborative course — not a sit-listen-take-notes type of class.

Expect to be actively involved in a series of in-class and outside assignments, both individual- and team-based, that will help you develop an understanding of how entrepreneurs are using information-centric technologies to create new markets and redefine old ones, and the lessons learned along the way. You may also explore your own ideas for new ventures along the way.

Th 9-11 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): John Danner

It takes critical thinking, outstanding leadership, and a little magic to be a successful project manager. Come and learn not only the essential building blocks of project management, but the tricks to managing a variety of complex projects. We will have a combination of interactive lectures, guest speakers, and case studies discussions to cover globally recognized standards, best practices and tools that successful project managers use.

Th 5:30-7:30 — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Anne Walker

Open data — data that is free for use, reuse, and redistribution — is an intellectual treasure-trove that has given rise to many unexpected and often fruitful applications. In this course, students will 1) learn how to access, visualize, clean, interpret, and share data, especially open data, using Python, Python-based libraries, and supplementary computational frameworks and 2) understand the theoretical underpinnings of open data and their connections to implementations in the physical and life sciences, government, social sciences, and journalism.

Section 1
TuTh 2-3:30 — 210 South Hall
Instructor(s): Raymond Yee

One hour colloquium per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Ph.D. standing in the School of Information. Colloquia, discussion, and readings designed to introduce students to the range of interests of the school.

M 12:30-2 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Paul Duguid

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 1
F 3-5 — 107 South Hall

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 4
M 2-4 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Deirdre Mulligan

This participatory class explores civic engagement and political activism in the information age, through the lens of technology-enabled collective action. We will focus on both the theory and real-world cases of the Internet mobilizing people by spreading alternative views and news — and the parallel emergence of collective identity and civic action. Students will read books on communication power, watch documentary films on the Arab Spring, and do case studies about US, Iran, China, and elsewhere. The class will also look into issues such as online surveillance and filtering, circumvention tools, and how repressive regimes have countered digital activism.

In addition to analytic readings, students will engage in collective knowledge-gathering and construct a resource wiki as public good. Students will do individual or group projects relating to concepts and themes discussed in this course.

This research seminar class is not limited to the graduate students in the School of Information; students from other departments on campus, including undergraduates, are welcome.

Section 5
Th 4-6 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Xiao Qiang

Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.  Two to four hours of seminar per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content.

Section 2
W 2-4 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Ramakrishna Akella, Ray Larson