Information Course Schedule fall 2010

Lower-Division

Course may be repeated for credit. One to four hours of directed group study per week. Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis. Lectures and small group discussions focusing on topics of interest, varying from semester to semester.

Section 2
Th 5-7 — 212 Wheeler
Instructor(s): Brian Carver Matt Senate

How can we critically think about emergent phenomena of the Internet? Is the Internet a democratic medium for political action (a "networked public sphere") or a surveillance apparatus of centralized control? Who has access to digital information and what techniques are used to make information artificially scarce? How do trade group lawsuits against digital "piracy" affect a generation's perception of the law? Should we look at the growing sphere of copyright as a public interest problem, or celebrate the expansion of creators' rights? Can free software thrive independently from ideological backing? Why are peer production communities like Wikipedia and Linux affected by extreme gender disparity?

In this course, we will examine the societal implications of computer networks from critical and technical perspectives. We will collectively engage with issues of intellectual property, access to information, privacy, freedom of speech, representation, and peer production. We will be discussing provocative texts and media, doing hands-on exploration of emerging technologies, and practicing ethnographic fieldwork in online communities. We will also offer opportunities for field trips and guest speakers to provide us with different perspectives. Additionally, students will engage in a semester-long collaborative project in a flexible format.

This is a student-initiated group study course (DE-Cal). Please contact the student coordinator(s) for specific questions.

Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.

Section 1
Tu 5-6:30 — 121 Wheeler
Instructor(s): Paul Duguid Max Klein, Matt Senate

Upper-Division

How can we critically think about emergent phenomena of the Internet? Is the Internet a democratic medium for political action (a "networked public sphere") or a surveillance apparatus of centralized control? Who has access to digital information and what techniques are used to make information artificially scarce? How do trade group lawsuits against digital "piracy" affect a generation's perception of the law? Should we look at the growing sphere of copyright as a public interest problem, or celebrate the expansion of creators' rights? Can free software thrive independently from ideological backing? Why are peer production communities like Wikipedia and Linux affected by extreme gender disparity?

In this course, we will examine the societal implications of computer networks from critical and technical perspectives. We will collectively engage with issues of intellectual property, access to information, privacy, freedom of speech, representation, and peer production. We will be discussing provocative texts and media, doing hands-on exploration of emerging technologies, and practicing ethnographic fieldwork in online communities. We will also offer opportunities for field trips and guest speakers to provide us with different perspectives. Additionally, students will engage in a semester-long collaborative project in a flexible format.

This is a student-initiated group study course (DE-Cal). Please contact the student coordinator(s) for specific questions.

Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.

Section 1
Tuesday 5-6:30 — 121 Wheeler
Instructor(s): Paul Duguid Matt Senate, Max Klein

Course may be repeated for credit. One to four hours of lecture per week. Meetings to be arranged. Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.

Section 2
Th 5-7 — 212 Wheeler
Instructor(s): Brian Carver Matt Senate

Graduate

15 weeks; 3 hours of lecture per week. This course introduces the intellectual foundations of information organization and retrieval: conceptual modeling, semantic representation, vocabulary and metadata design, classification, and standardization, as well as information retrieval practices, technology, and applications, including computational processes for analyzing information in both textual and non-textual formats.

MW 9-10:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Robert Glushko

7 weeks - 4 hours of laboratory per week. This course introduces software skills used in building prototype scripts for applications in data science and information management. The course gives an overview of procedural programming, object-oriented programming, and functional programming techniques in the Python scripting language, together with an overview of fundamental data structures, associated algorithms, and asymptotic performance analysis. Students will watch a set of instructional videos covering material and will have four hours of laboratory-style course contact each week.

MW 10:30-12 (Lab: W 12-1) — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): John Chuang

This course addresses concepts and methods of user experience research, from understanding and identifying needs, to evaluating concepts and designs, to assessing the usability of products and solutions. We emphasize methods of collecting and interpreting qualitative data about user activities, working both individually and in teams, and translating them into design decisions. Students gain hands-on practice with observation, interview, survey, focus groups, and expert review. Team activities and group work are required during class and for most assignments. Additional topics include research in enterprise, consulting, and startup organizations, lean/agile techniques, mobile research approaches, and strategies for communicating findings.

TuTh 2-3:30 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Nancy Van House

Three hours of lecture per week. This course covers the practical and theoretical issues associated with computer-mediated communication (CMC) systems (e.g., email, newsgroups, wikis, online games, etc.). We will focus on the analysis of CMC practices, the relationship between technology and behavior, and the design and implementation issues associated with constructing CMC systems. This course primarily takes a social scientific approach (including research from social psychology, economics, sociology, and communication).

TuTh 12:30-2 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Coye Cheshire

Three hours of lecture per week. Policy and technical issues related to insuring the accuracy and privacy of information. Encoding and decoding techniques including public and private key encryption. Survey of security problems in networked information environment including viruses, worms, trojan horses, Internet address spoofing.

MW 2-3:30 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Doug Tygar

Three hours of lecture per week. This course focuses on managing people in information-intensive firms and industries, such as information technology industries. Topics include managing knowledge workers; managing teams (including virtual ones); collaborating across disparate units, giving and receiving feedback; managing the innovation process (including in eco-systems); managing through networks; and managing when using communication tools (e.g., tele-presence). The course relies heavily on cases as a pedagogical form.

F 9-12 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Morten Hansen

Three hours of lecture per week. Using a mix of theory and case studies, the course provides students with different backgrounds a unifying view of the design life cycle, making them more effective and versatile designers.

MW 2-3:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Robert Glushko

Three hours of lecture per week. The philosophical, legal, historical, and economic analysis of the need for and uses of laws protecting intellectual property. Topics include types of intellectual property (copyright, patent, trade secrecy), the interaction between law and technology, various approaches (including compulsory licensing), and the relationship between intellectual property and compatibility standards.

TuTh 9:30-11 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Brian Carver

Three hours of lecture. The Extensible Markup Language (XML), with its ability to define formal structural and semantic definitions for metadata and information models, is the key enabling technology for information services and document-centric business models that use the Internet and its family of protocols. This course introduces XML syntax, transformations, schema languages, and the querying of XML databases. It balances conceptual topics with practical skills for designing, implementing, and handling conceptual models as XML schemas.

TuTh 9-10:30 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Erik Wilde

Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to relational, hierarchical, network, and object-oriented database management systems. Database design concepts, query languages for database applications (such as SQL), concurrency control, recovery techniques, database security. Issues in the management of databases. Use of report writers, application generators, high level interface generators.

TuTh 11-12:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Ray Larson

Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to many different types of quantitative research methods, with an emphasis on linking quantitative statistical techniques to real-world research methods. Introductory and intermediate topics include: defining research problems, theory testing, causal inference, probability and univariate statistics. Research design and methodology topics include: primary/secondary survey data analysis, experimental designs, and coding qualitative data for quantitative analysis. No prerequisites, though an introductory course in statistics is recommended.

TuTh 11-12:30 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Coye Cheshire
Three hours of lecture per week. Theory and practice of naturalistic inquiry. Grounded theory. Ethnographic methods including interviews, focus groups, naturalistic observation. Case studies. Analysis of qualitative data. Issues of validity and generalizability in qualitative research.
TuTh 3:30-5 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jenna Burrell

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 6
M 3:30-5:30 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kimiko Ryokai

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 2
TuTh 2-3:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Erik Wilde

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 9
M 3:30-5:30 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Erin Knight, Nathan Gandomi

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 4
Tu 5-7 (Lab: Th 4-5) — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Ryan Greenberg

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 7
F 1-4 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Tapan Parikh

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 10
F 12-1 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jenna Burrell, Tapan Parikh

Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture per week for five weeks.

Section 1
M 3:30-6:30 (Aug. 30 - Oct. 4) — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Quentin Hardy

One hour colloquium per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Ph.D. standing in the School of Information. Colloquia, discussion, and readings designed to introduce students to the range of interests of the school.

M 12:30-2 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Steven Weber

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 1
F 3-5 — 107 South Hall

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 2
W 2-4 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Deirdre Mulligan