Information Course Schedule spring 2008

Upper-Division

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

F 2-5 — 126 Barrows
Instructor(s): Howard Rheingold

Core

This course is designed to be an introduction to the topics and issues associated with information and information technology and its role in society. Throughout the semester we will consider both the consequence and impact of technologies on social groups and on social interaction and how society defines and shapes the technologies that are produced. Students will be exposed to a broad range of applied and practical problems, theoretical issues, as well as methods used in social scientific analysis. The four sections of the course are: 1) theories of technology in society, 2) information technology in workplaces 3) automation vs. humans, and 4) networked sociability.

8 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week.

TuTh 12:30-2 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Coye Cheshire

This course uses examples from various commercial domains — retail, health, credit, entertainment, social media, and biosensing/quantified self — to explore legal and ethical issues including freedom of expression, privacy, research ethics, consumer protection, information and cybersecurity, and copyright. The class emphasizes how existing legal and policy frameworks constrain, inform, and enable the architecture, interfaces, data practices, and consumer facing policies and documentation of such offerings; and, fosters reflection on the ethical impact of information and communication technologies and the role of information professionals in legal and ethical work.

7 weeks - 4 hours of lecture per week.

M 2-4 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Pamela Samuelson

As information becomes increasingly strategic for all organizations, technology professionals must also develop the core business skills required to build personal brand, expand influence, build high-quality relationships, and deliver on critical enterprise projects. Using a combination of business and academic readings, case discussions and guest speakers, this course will explore a series of critical business topics that apply to both start-up and Fortune 500 enterprises. Subjects include: communication and presentation skills, software and product development methodologies, negotiation skills, employee engagement, organizational structures and career paths, successful interviewing, and CV preparation.

W 2-4 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Michael Schaffer

General

Three hours of lecture per week. The role of information and information technology in organizations and society. Topics include societal needs and demands, sociology of knowledge and science, diffusion of knowledge and technology, information seeking and use, information and culture, and technology and culture.

W 1-4 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Elizabeth Churchill, Nancy Van House
Three hours of lecture per week. User interface design and human-computer interaction. Examination of alternative design. Tools and methods for design and development. Human computer interaction. Methods for measuring and evaluating interface quality.
TuTh 3:30-5 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Tapan Parikh

Three hours of lecture per week. An examination of the nature of corporate, non-profit, and governmental information policy. The appropriate role of the government in production and dissemination of information, the tension between privacy and freedom of access to information. Issues of potential conflicts in values and priorities in information policy.

TuTh 2-3:30 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Yale Braunstein
Info 235. Cyberlaw (3 units)

Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to legal issues in information management, antitrust, contract management, international law including intellectual property, trans-border data flow, privacy, libel, and constitutional rights.

Th 3:30-6:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Brian Carver, Aaron Perzanowski

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 202: Information Organization and Retrieval. This course introduces the discipline of Document Engineering: specifying, designing, and deploying electronic documents and information repositories that enable document-centric applications. These applications include web services, virtual enterprises, information supply chains, single-source publishing, and syndication in domains as diverse as healthcare, education, e-commerce, and e-government.

MW 9-10:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Robert Glushko

The design and presentation of digital information. Use of graphics, animation, sound, visualization software, and hypermedia in presenting information to the user. Methods of presenting complex information to enhance comprehension and analysis. Incorporation of visualization techniques into human-computer interfaces. Three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.

MW 10:30-12 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst
Advanced topics in information management, focusing on design of relational databases, querying, and normalization. New issues raised by the World Wide Web. Research projects on current topics in information technology. Also listed as Industrial Engin and Oper Research C215.
W 6-8 (Lab: F 11-12 in 1173 Etcheverry) — 287 Cory Hall
Instructor(s): Mohamed Zait

Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to many different types of quantitative research methods, with an emphasis on linking quantitative statistical techniques to real-world research methods. Introductory and intermediate topics include: defining research problems, theory testing, causal inference, probability and univariate statistics. Research design and methodology topics include: primary/secondary survey data analysis, experimental designs, and coding qualitative data for quantitative analysis. No prerequisites, though an introductory course in statistics is recommended.

TuTh 2-3:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Coye Cheshire
Three hours of lecture per week. Theory and practice of naturalistic inquiry. Grounded theory. Ethnographic methods including interviews, focus groups, naturalistic observation. Case studies. Analysis of qualitative data. Issues of validity and generalizability in qualitative research.
TuTh 10:30-12 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jenna Burrell

Special Topics

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 16
MW 12:30-2 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Raymond Yee

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 13
TuTh 11-12:30 — 3107Etcheverry
Instructor(s): David Dornfeld

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 7
Tu 2-4 — F320 Haas
Instructor(s): Larry Lasky

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 14
Tu 2-4 — C135 Cheit
Instructor(s): Edmund Egan

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 11
Th 8-11 — C210 Cheit
Instructor(s): Don Proctor

This course provides credit to students working in the IS clinical program. Students will work on projects for campus clients, supervised by the IS clinical staff. Classroom time will include material on client services, client management and workshops for issues that appear in the course of the semester across projects. Grade or pass fail - may be repeated one time for credit.

Section 23
Th 3:30-5 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Eric Kansa

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 24
W 12-2 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Ravi Nemana

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 8
M 2-4 — C220 Cheit
Instructor(s): Henry Chesbrough

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 5
Th 4-6 — C135 Cheit
Instructor(s): Flavio Feferman

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content

Section 1
W 6-7 (10 week course to meet January 23 - April 2) — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Ashwin Mathew, John Chuang

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 6
MW 4-5:30 — C125 Cheit
Instructor(s): Andrew Isaacs

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 18
Tu 10:30-1:30 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jens Grossklags, John Chuang

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 12
M 2-4 — F320 Haas
Instructor(s): Richard Huntsinger

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 17
M 12-2 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Isha Ray, AnnaLee Saxenian

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 9
M 6-9 — C330 Cheit
Instructor(s): Reza Moazzami

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 19
Th 8:30-10:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Erik Wilde

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 15
Tu 4-6 — C220 Cheit
Instructor(s): Andrew Isaacs, Christine Rosen

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 4
Tu 8:30-10:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Erik Wilde

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 20
M 4-6 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kimiko Ryokai

How does the design of new educational technologies change the way children learn and think? Which aspects of creative thinking and learning can technology support? How do we design systems that reflect our understanding of how we learn? This course explores issues in designing and evaluating technologies that support creativity and learning. The class will cover theories of creativity and learning, implications for design, as well as a survey of new educational technologies such as works in computer supported collaborative learning, digital manipulatives, and immersive learning environments.

Section 2
Th 9-12 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Kimiko Ryokai

Seminar

One hour colloquium per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Ph.D. standing in the School of Information. Colloquia, discussion, and readings designed to introduce students to the range of interests of the school.

M 10-11:30 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Jenna Burrell

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 1
F 3-5 — 202 South Hall