Information Course Schedule fall 2004

Upper-Division

Three hours lecture per week. Focus on European Americans, Native Americans, African Americans, and in the western United States, Asian Americans and Chicano/Latinos. The course explores the nature of oral and print societies as found in the focus cultures to assess the impact of the dominant print culture on oral cultures. Image in woodcut and engraving as information and propaganda. The role of education in achieving literacy. The emergence of an African American press in the 19th century, tied to growing politcal support from the abolitionist press, is in striking contrast to the nearly invisible Native American voice confined to the reservation. San Francisco is a case study of the early emergence of a multicultural print and education environment, followed by restrictive laws, propaganda, and educational system that enforced cultural standardization and use of English. Printing technology tends toward centralization, standardization, and few participants, an environment that inhibits the voices of a multicultural, multilingual population. This course satisfies the American cultures requirement.

MWF 4-5 — 174 Barrows
Instructor(s): Mary Kay Duggan

Course may be repeated for credit. One to four hours of lecture per week. Meetings to be arranged. Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.

Section 1
Th 7-8:30 PM — 109 Wheeler
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst

Core

8 weeks; 3 hours of lecture per week. This course introduces the intellectual foundations of information organization and retrieval: conceptual modeling, semantic representation, vocabulary and metadata design, classification, and standardization, as well as information retrieval practices, technology, and applications, including computational processes for analyzing information in both textual and non-textual formats.

TTh 10:30-12 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Ray Larson Marc Davis

This course is designed to be an introduction to the topics and issues associated with information and information technology and its role in society. Throughout the semester we will consider both the consequence and impact of technologies on social groups and on social interaction and how society defines and shapes the technologies that are produced. Students will be exposed to a broad range of applied and practical problems, theoretical issues, as well as methods used in social scientific analysis. The four sections of the course are: 1) theories of technology in society, 2) information technology in workplaces 3) automation vs. humans, and 4) networked sociability.

8 weeks - 3 hours of lecture per week.

TTh 12:30-2 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Peter Lyman, Nancy Van House

General

Three hours of lecture per week. Factors strongly impacting the success of new computing and communications products and services (based on underlying technologies such as electronics and software) in commercial applications. Technology trends and limits, economics, standardization, intellectual property, government policy, and industrial organizations. Strategies to manage the design and marketing of successful products and services.
TTh 2-3:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): David Messerschmitt, Carl Shapiro

Three hours of lecture per week. The measurement and analysis of the role information plays in the economy and of the resources devoted to production, distribution, and consumption of information. Economic analysis of the information industry. Macroeconomics of information.

MW 10:30-12 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Yale Braunstein

Three hours of lecture per week. The philosophical, legal, historical, and economic analysis of the need for and uses of laws protecting intellectual property. Topics include types of intellectual property (copyright, patent, trade secrecy), the interaction between law and technology, various approaches (including compulsory licensing), and the relationship between intellectual property and compatibility standards.

TTh 12:30-2 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Larry Downes

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 202, 203 or consent of instructor. Concepts and methods of design, management, creation, and evaluation of multimedia information systems. Theory and practice of digital media production, reception, organization, retrieval, and reuse. Review of applicable digital technology with special emphasis on digital video. Course will involve group projects in the design and development of digital media systems and applications.

MW 2-3:30 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marc Davis

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 206 or equivalent. Communications concepts, network architectures, data communication software and hardware, networks (e.g. LAN, wide), network protocols (e.g. TCP/IP), network management, distributed information systems. Policy and management implications of the technology.

TTh 3:30-5 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): John Chuang
Three hours of lecture, one hour of programming laboratory per week. Prerequisites: An introductory programming course in a high-level language (such as C, Java, or C++) and consent of instructor. Introduction to programming paradigms, including object-oriented design. Introduction to design and analysis of algorithms, includingalgorithms for sorting and searching. Analysis, use, and implementation of data structures important for information processing systems, including arrays, lists, strings, b-trees, and hash tables. Introduction to formal languages including regular expressions and context-free grammars.
TTh 9-10:30 (lecture)<br>Th 2-3:30 (lab) — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Brian Hayes

Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to relational, hierarchical, network, and object-oriented database management systems. Database design concepts, query languages for database applications (such as SQL), concurrency control, recovery techniques, database security. Issues in the management of databases. Use of report writers, application generators, high level interface generators.

MW 9-10:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Ray Larson
Three hours of lecture per week. Theory and practice of naturalistic inquiry. Grounded theory. Ethnographic methods including interviews, focus groups, naturalistic observation. Case studies. Analysis of qualitative data. Issues of validity and generalizability in qualitative research.
TTh 3:30-5 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Peter Lyman

Special Topics

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 8
TTh 11-12:30 — C220 Cheit
Instructor(s): Larry Downes

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 9
Th 6-9:30 — C125 Cheit
Instructor(s): Angelo Artale

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 10
W 1-4 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Paul Duguid, Geoffrey Nunberg

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 14
Tu 4-6 — C325 Cheit
Instructor(s): Thomas Sanders

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 12
Tu 2-4 — C220 Cheit
Instructor(s): Richard Grant

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 15
MW 9:30-11 — 203 McLaughlin
Instructor(s): Paul Wright

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 7
M 6-9 — C325 Cheit
Instructor(s): Reza Moazzami

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 11
MW 11-12:30 — C330 Cheit
Instructor(s): Jihong Sanderson

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 3
Th 5-8 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Adam Blum

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 5
MW 9:30-11 — C220 Cheit
Instructor(s): Alice Agogino, Mark Martin

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 2
MW 10:30-12 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 6
MW 4-5:30 — C125 Cheit
Instructor(s): Andrew Isaacs

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 17
Th 12:30-2 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Robert Glushko, Alex Miłowski

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 1
TTh 8-9, F 10-12 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Yale Braunstein

Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture per week for five weeks.

Section 16
W 12:30-2,<br> Th 3:30-5<br>(5 weeks only: Sept 8 - Oct 7) — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Robert Glushko

Seminar

One hour colloquium per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Ph.D. standing in the School of Information. Colloquia, discussion, and readings designed to introduce students to the range of interests of the school.

Th 9-10:30 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): AnnaLee Saxenian

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 1
F 3-5 — 107 South Hall