Information Course Schedule spring 2002

Upper-Division

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Undergraduate in good standing, and experience with personal computing and productivity applications. Any student who can successfully use a personal computer to author documents, browse the World Wide Web, etc. can successfully complete this course. Description: Introduction to applications of networked computers, especially social, educational, and information management. Understanding of the networking, computing, and software infrastructure enabling and constraining these networked applications, with the goal of empowering the student to use these technologies effectively in their personal and professional life. Related policy, legal, economic, and industry issues will be covered. Also listed as Engineering C111.
MWF 2-3 — 60 Evans Hall
Instructor(s): David Messerschmitt

Three hours lecture per week. Focus on European Americans, Native Americans, African Americans, and in the western United States, Asian Americans and Chicano/Latinos. The course explores the nature of oral and print societies as found in the focus cultures to assess the impact of the dominant print culture on oral cultures. Image in woodcut and engraving as information and propaganda. The role of education in achieving literacy. The emergence of an African American press in the 19th century, tied to growing politcal support from the abolitionist press, is in striking contrast to the nearly invisible Native American voice confined to the reservation. San Francisco is a case study of the early emergence of a multicultural print and education environment, followed by restrictive laws, propaganda, and educational system that enforced cultural standardization and use of English. Printing technology tends toward centralization, standardization, and few participants, an environment that inhibits the voices of a multicultural, multilingual population. This course satisfies the American cultures requirement.

MWF 10-11 — 88 Dwinelle Hall
Instructor(s): Mary Kay Duggan

Core

7 weeks - 4 hours of laboratory per week. This course introduces software skills used in building prototype scripts for applications in data science and information management. The course gives an overview of procedural programming, object-oriented programming, and functional programming techniques in the Python scripting language, together with an overview of fundamental data structures, associated algorithms, and asymptotic performance analysis. Students will watch a set of instructional videos covering material and will have four hours of laboratory-style course contact each week.

TTh 10:30-12 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): John Chuang, Doug Tygar
Three hours of lecture per week. Project planning and scheduling, process design, project management and coordination. Analysis of information needs, specification of system requirements, analysis of alternatives, design of alternatives. Quantitative methods and tools for analysis and decision making. Document management. Design, implementation, and evaluation of a project.
TTh 9-10:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Yale Braunstein, Peter Lyman

General

Three hours of lecture per week. User interface design and human-computer interaction. Examination of alternative design. Tools and methods for design and development. Human computer interaction. Methods for measuring and evaluating interface quality.
TTh 12:30-2 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst

This course addresses concepts and methods of user experience research, from understanding and identifying needs, to evaluating concepts and designs, to assessing the usability of products and solutions. We emphasize methods of collecting and interpreting qualitative data about user activities, working both individually and in teams, and translating them into design decisions. Students gain hands-on practice with observation, interview, survey, focus groups, and expert review. Team activities and group work are required during class and for most assignments. Additional topics include research in enterprise, consulting, and startup organizations, lean/agile techniques, mobile research approaches, and strategies for communicating findings.

TTh 2-3:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Nancy Van House

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 202 or consent of instructor. Theories and methods for searching and retrieval of text and bibliographic information. Analysis of relevance, utility. Statistical and linguistic methods for automatic indexing and classification. Boolean and probabilistic approaches to indexing, query formulation, and output ranking. Filtering methods. Measures of retrieval effectiveness and retrieval experimentation methodology.

MW 11-12:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Ray Larson

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 202 or consent of instructor. Standards and practices for organization and discription of bibliographic, textual, and non textual collections. Design, selection, maintenance and evaluation of cataloging, classification, indexing and thesaurus systems for specific settings. Codes, formats and standards for data representation and transfer of data.

MW 9-10:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Michael Buckland

The design and presentation of digital information. Use of graphics, animation, sound, visualization software, and hypermedia in presenting information to the user. Methods of presenting complex information to enhance comprehension and analysis. Incorporation of visualization techniques into human-computer interfaces. Three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.

F 2-5 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst
Three hours of lecture per week. The organization and administration of library services and their place in the institutions and communities they serve. Governance, collections, and buildings. Planning, organizing, innovation, staffing, budgeting, controlling. Technological change, digital libraries. Political and economic aspects.
F 9-12 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Michael Buckland

Special Topics

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 5
Tu 4-6 — C210 Cheit Hall
Instructor(s): Trudy Kehret-Ward

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 4
TTh 3:30-5 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Robert Glushko

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 2
Tu 3:30-5 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): John Canny, Nancy Van House

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 7
Th 6-9:30 — C125 Cheit Hall
Instructor(s): Terrence Hendershott

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 3
WF 11-12:30 — C125 Cheit Hall
Instructor(s): Robert Cole

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 1
Th 4:30-6:30 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Warren Sack

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 6
W 2-5 — C135 Cheit Hall
Instructor(s): Andrew Isaacs

Seminar

One hour colloquium per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Ph.D. standing in the School of Information. Colloquia, discussion, and readings designed to introduce students to the range of interests of the school.

Th 12:30-2 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): John Chuang

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 3
Tu 4-7 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): AnnaLee Saxenian

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 1
F 3-5 — 107 South Hall

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 2
W 2-4 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Nancy Van House