Social & Cultural Studies

Related Faculty

Morgan G. Ames
Assistant Adjunct Professor
Alumni (MIMS 2006)
Science and technology studies; education; anthropology; youth technocultures; ideology and inequity; critical data science
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Associate Professor
technology appropriation in non-Western societies, technology and socio-economic development, qualitative research methods
Coye Cheshire
Professor
Trust, social exchange, social psychology, and information exchange
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Adjunct Professor
The concept of information; the history of information; the history of "technocracy"; critical information studies.
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Adjunct Professor
The theory, history and social role of "information."

Recent Publications

The Charisma Machine: The Life, Death, and Legacy of One Laptop per Child, by Morgan G. Ames
Nov 12, 2019

In The Charisma Machine, Morgan Ames chronicles the life and legacy of the One Laptop per Child project and explains why — despite its failures — the same utopian visions that inspired OLPC still motivate other projects trying to use technology to “disrupt” education and development.

Mar 15, 2019

Professionals tasked with preserving online security hope to use new machine-learning based techniques to develop a “fairer” system to determine patterns of “good” and “bad” usage, moving beyond regional blocking. However, we argue that these systems may continue to embed unequal treatments, and troublingly may further disguise such discrimination behind more complex and less transparent automated assessment.

Dec 15, 2018

What can machines know about the mind? This dissertation seeks to understand people’s beliefs about this question: how these beliefs affect and arise from interactions with digital sensors, from prior beliefs about the mind and the body; and how these beliefs may shape the design of technical systems in the future.

The purpose of this dissertation is twofold. First, it surfaces that the boundary between sensing bodies and sensing minds is unstable, deeply entangled with social context and beliefs about the body and mind. Second, it proposes the porousness of this boundary as a site for studying the role that biosensing devices will play in near future. As biosensors creep into smart watches, bands, and ingestibles, their ability to divine not just what these bodies do, but what they think and feel, presents an under-explored avenue for understanding and imagining how thesetechnologies will come to matter in the course of life.

Nov 8, 2018

We investigate cybersecurity toolkits, collections of public facing materials intended to help users achieve security online. We look at design dimensions of these toolkits, and investigate how the toolkits construct security as a value and how they construct people as (in)secure users.

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Social & Cultural Studies news

The Charisma Machine: The Life, Death, and Legacy of One Laptop Per Child

Morgan G. Ames explores the rise and fall of the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project in her new book, The Charisma Machine: The Life, Death, and Legacy of One Laptop Per Child

Shazeda Ahmed

Ph.D. student Shazeda Ahmed writes that foreign media has painted a dystopian portrait of China’s social credit system. The reality is both less coherent and more complex.

Jen King

School of Information alumna Jennifer King was honored by the iSchools organization for her doctoral dissertation, “Privacy, Disclosure, and Social Exchange Theory.”

Richmond Wong

Instead of looking for design solutions to fix existing problems in privacy, I School researchers used speculative design fictions to explore the potential privacy issues that may arise in future uses and adoptions of emerging biosensing technologies.

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