Privacy

Related Faculty

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Professor
Bio-sensory computing; information economics and policy
Chris Hoofnagle
Adjunct Professor
Internet law, information privacy, consumer protection, cybersecurity, computer crime, regulation of technology, edtech
Deirdre K. Mulligan
Associate Professor
privacy, fairness, human rights, cybersecurity, technology and governance, values in design

Recent Publications

May 8, 2019

This paper reviews HCI research on privacy and design to discuss how utilizing a broader range of design methods from HCI can help support “privacy by design” efforts.

Dec 15, 2018

What can machines know about the mind? This dissertation seeks to understand people’s beliefs about this question: how these beliefs affect and arise from interactions with digital sensors, from prior beliefs about the mind and the body; and how these beliefs may shape the design of technical systems in the future.

The purpose of this dissertation is twofold. First, it surfaces that the boundary between sensing bodies and sensing minds is unstable, deeply entangled with social context and beliefs about the body and mind. Second, it proposes the porousness of this boundary as a site for studying the role that biosensing devices will play in near future. As biosensors creep into smart watches, bands, and ingestibles, their ability to divine not just what these bodies do, but what they think and feel, presents an under-explored avenue for understanding and imagining how thesetechnologies will come to matter in the course of life.

May 8, 2018

The creators of technical infrastructure are under social and legal pressure to comply with expectations that can be difficult to translate into computational and business logics. This dissertation bridges this gap through three projects that focus on privacy engineering, information security, and data economics, respectively. These projects culminate in a new formal method for evaluating the strategic and tactical value of data: data games. This method relies on a core theoretical contribution building on the work of Shannon, Dretske, Pearl, Koller, and Nissenbaum: a definition of situated information flow as causal flow in the context of other causal relations and strategic choices.

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Privacy news

Jen King

School of Information alumna Jennifer King was honored by the iSchools organization for her doctoral dissertation, “Privacy, Disclosure, and Social Exchange Theory.”

Richmond Wong

Instead of looking for design solutions to fix existing problems in privacy, I School researchers used speculative design fictions to explore the potential privacy issues that may arise in future uses and adoptions of emerging biosensing technologies.

Mark Zuckerberg caricature (image courtesy of Flickr user DonkeyHotey https://flic.kr/p/bZGj6W)

Chris Hoofnagle discusses the policing of Facebook’s privacy policies and FTC enforcement.

Jen King

Facebook is right to claim this incident was no breach  —  this is Facebook’s platform working exactly as designed.

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The award honors their research on the unwritten laws of privacy and the book Privacy on the Ground.
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Once a pervasive surveillance infrastructure is in place, a government will always have an incentive to abuse that power, according to new research.
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Capped by a keynote from Obama adviser John Podesta, a day-long workshop brought together the worlds of government, business, the law, and academia for what assistant professor Deirdre Mulligan called “a frank and honest conversation about our values,” and about how to balance those values with the omnipresent, often invisible collection of data about every aspect of our lives.
Jen King
A report on mobile privacy released this morning by the Federal Trade Commission incorporates a number of recommendations from Ph.D. student Jennifer King. King is a fourth-year Ph.D. student in the School of Information, where she studies online privacy and how people make their privacy decisions.

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