Information Policy

Related Faculty

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Professor
chuang@ischool.berkeley.edu
Focus: Bio-sensory computing; information economics and policy
Chris Hoofnagle
Adjunct Professor
chris@ischool.berkeley.edu
Focus: Internet law, information privacy, consumer protection, cybersecurity, computer crime, regulation of technology, edtech
(510) 643-0213
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Associate Professor
dkm@ischool.berkeley.edu
Focus: privacy, cybersecurity, technology and governance, values in design
(510) 642-0499
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Dean of the I School and Professor (I School and Dept. of City and Regional Planning)
dean@ischool.berkeley.edu
Focus: Regional economic development, Entrepreneurship, Silicon Valley.
(510) 642-9980

Information Policy news

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Chris Jay Hoofnagle, Deirdre Mulligan, and others weighed in on an ongoing lawsuit challenging the authority of the Federal Trade Commission to regulate companies’ data security practices.

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In a new article, I School scholars ponder the implications of considering cybersecurity a public good, like public health.
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The award honors their research on the unwritten laws of privacy and the book Privacy on the Ground.
Ashwin Mathew
Mathew honored for his Ph.D. dissertation, which explored the location of political power in Internet infrastructure.
Executive director Dr. Betsy Cooper and senior fellow Jonathan Reiber join research center.
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Is technology affecting our mental health? Can technology support free speech and still protect against harassment? How do we embed our biases in big data algorithms? The Center for Technology, Society & Policy wants to explore these questions and more.
Deirdre K. Mulligan
Statement to US Copyright Office urges reform of the laws inhibiting cybersecurity research.
Xiao Qiang
Professor Xiao was named to the list for “for taking on China’s Great Firewall of censorship.”
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Facebook is grappling with its impact on our social and emotional lives  —  and that’s a good thing. But it has to get the research right. Why Facebook did the experiment, and how to make it better.

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