Human-computer Interaction (HCI)

Related Faculty

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Professor
Bio-sensory computing; information economics and policy
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Professor
Human-computer interaction, information visualization, computational linguistics, search and information retrieval, improving MOOCs and online education
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Assistant Professor
Data management, interactive or human-in-the-loop data analytics, information visualization, crowdsourcing, data science
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Associate Professor
Human-computer interaction, tangible user interfaces
Niloufar Salehi is an assistant professor at the School of Information at UC Berkeley..
Assistant Professor

Recent Publications

Dec 15, 2018

What can machines know about the mind? This dissertation seeks to understand people’s beliefs about this question: how these beliefs affect and arise from interactions with digital sensors, from prior beliefs about the mind and the body; and how these beliefs may shape the design of technical systems in the future.

The purpose of this dissertation is twofold. First, it surfaces that the boundary between sensing bodies and sensing minds is unstable, deeply entangled with social context and beliefs about the body and mind. Second, it proposes the porousness of this boundary as a site for studying the role that biosensing devices will play in near future. As biosensors creep into smart watches, bands, and ingestibles, their ability to divine not just what these bodies do, but what they think and feel, presents an under-explored avenue for understanding and imagining how thesetechnologies will come to matter in the course of life.

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Human-computer Interaction (HCI) news

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Ph.D. student Shazeda Ahmed writes that foreign media has painted a dystopian portrait of China’s social credit system. The reality is both less coherent and more complex.

Richmond Wong

Instead of looking for design solutions to fix existing problems in privacy, I School researchers used speculative design fictions to explore the potential privacy issues that may arise in future uses and adoptions of emerging biosensing technologies.

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I School researchers have developed a custom-fit earpiece that that can capture “passthoughts” through brainwave signals from the ear canal, and for the first time demonstrated one-step three-factor authentication.

(photo courtesy of Nicola/Flickr https://flic.kr/p/kMJqhB)

An increasing number of apps let users share their heartrate with friends. Now a pair of researchers are exploring how sharing your biosignals can affect your interpersonal interactions.

Professor Marti Hearst

Hearst’s HCI research includes user interfaces for search, information visualization of text, web site usability, and innovation in education.

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The smart fabric could be used to create clothes with dynamically changing colors or patterns. But who would wear clothes that double as a computer display? And why? New research explores these questions.

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Is technology affecting our mental health? Can technology support free speech and still protect against harassment? How do we embed our biases in big data algorithms? The Center for Technology, Society & Policy wants to explore these questions and more.
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The dataset could help answer whether it’s possible to accurately use consumer-grade devices to interpret attention level in a problem-solving test. The class hopes that other researchers will be able to repeat the experiment with even larger subject pools.
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Facebook is grappling with its impact on our social and emotional lives  —  and that’s a good thing. But it has to get the research right. Why Facebook did the experiment, and how to make it better.
Laura Devendorf makes a toy gun from hot glue and candy, following the computer's instructions.
Machines increasingly do humans’ jobs. But what happens when a human performs a machine’s tasks? A new project by doctoral student Laura Devendorf explores that role reversal, with unexpected insights into the creative process how people interact with machines.

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