Information Course Schedule spring 1999

Lower-Division

Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar per week. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.  The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in many campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Th 3-4 — 251 Moffitt
Instructor(s): Margaret Phillips

Upper-Division

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Undergraduate in good standing, and experience with personal computing and productivity applications. Any student who can successfully use a personal computer to author documents, browse the World Wide Web, etc. can successfully complete this course. Description: Introduction to applications of networked computers, especially social, educational, and information management. Understanding of the networking, computing, and software infrastructure enabling and constraining these networked applications, with the goal of empowering the student to use these technologies effectively in their personal and professional life. Related policy, legal, economic, and industry issues will be covered. Also listed as Engineering C111.
MWF 1-2 — 247 Cory
Instructor(s): David Messerschmitt

Core

Three hours of lecture per week. Project planning and scheduling, process design, project management and coordination. Analysis of information needs, specification of system requirements, analysis of alternatives, design of alternatives. Quantitative methods and tools for analysis and decision making. Document management. Design, implementation, and evaluation of a project.
TTh 9:30-11 — 202 South Hall

General

Three hours of lecture per week. The role of information and information technology in organizations and society. Topics include societal needs and demands, sociology of knowledge and science, diffusion of knowledge and technology, information seeking and use, information and culture, and technology and culture.

MW 11-12:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Barry Wellman
Three hours of lecture per week. User interface design and human-computer interaction. Examination of alternative design. Tools and methods for design and development. Human computer interaction. Methods for measuring and evaluating interface quality.
TTh 11-12:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst

This course addresses concepts and methods of user experience research, from understanding and identifying needs, to evaluating concepts and designs, to assessing the usability of products and solutions. We emphasize methods of collecting and interpreting qualitative data about user activities, working both individually and in teams, and translating them into design decisions. Students gain hands-on practice with observation, interview, survey, focus groups, and expert review. Team activities and group work are required during class and for most assignments. Additional topics include research in enterprise, consulting, and startup organizations, lean/agile techniques, mobile research approaches, and strategies for communicating findings.

M 3:30-6 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Nancy Van House

Three hours of lecture per week. Policy and technical issues related to insuring the accuracy and privacy of information. Encoding and decoding techniques including public and private key encryption. Survey of security problems in networked information environment including viruses, worms, trojan horses, Internet address spoofing.

TTh 12:30-2 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Doug Tygar
Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to internal and external management issues and practices in information organizations. Internal issues: organizational behavior, organizational theory, personnel, budgeting, planning. External issues: organizational environments, politics, marketing, strategic planning, funding sources.
TTh 2-3:30 — 205 South Hall

Three hours of lecture per week. An examination of the nature of corporate, non-profit, and governmental information policy. The appropriate role of the government in production and dissemination of information, the tension between privacy and freedom of access to information. Issues of potential conflicts in values and priorities in information policy.

M 2-5 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Peter Lyman
Three hours of lecture per week. Factors strongly impacting the success of new computing and communications products and services (based on underlying technologies such as electronics and software) in commercial applications. Technology trends and limits, economics, standardization, intellectual property, government policy, and industrial organizations. Strategies to manage the design and marketing of successful products and services.
TTh 9:30-11 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): David Messerschmitt, Hal Varian

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 202, 203 or consent of instructor. Concepts and methods of design, management, creation, and evaluation of multimedia information systems. Theory and practice of digital media production, reception, organization, retrieval, and reuse. Review of applicable digital technology with special emphasis on digital video. Course will involve group projects in the design and development of digital media systems and applications.

Tu 1-4 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Howard Besser

Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 206 or equivalent. Communications concepts, network architectures, data communication software and hardware, networks (e.g. LAN, wide), network protocols (e.g. TCP/IP), network management, distributed information systems. Policy and management implications of the technology.

MW 12:30-2 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Mark Ginsburg

Three hours of lecture per week. Group development of database applications using a commercial database management system. Includes developing functional specifications, data model, database design, interface design, system implementation, documentation.

Tu 3:30-5:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Michael Cooper
Three hours of lecture per week. Quantitative methods for data collection and analysis. Research design. Conceptualization, operationalization, measurement. Modes of data collection, including experiments, survey research, observation. Sampling. Basics of data analysis.
MW 2-3:30 — 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Barry Wellman

Special Topics

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 1
F 9-12 — 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Michael Buckland

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 3
Tu 4-5:30 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): John Canny, Nancy Van House

Specific topics, hours and credit may vary from section to section, year to year. May be repeated for credit with change in content.

Section 2
W 12-2 — 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Howard Besser

Seminar

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 1
F 3-5 — 107 South Hall

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 2
Tu 4-6 — 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Peter Lyman, Pamela Samuelson

Topics in information management and systems and related fields. Specific topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit, with change of content. May be offered as a two semester sequence.

Section 3
M 12-2 — 110 South Hall