Information Course Schedule spring 1999

Lower Division Courses

Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar per week. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.  The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in many campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.

Th 3-4 | 251 Moffitt
Instructor(s): Margaret Phillips
CCN:
42702

Upper Division Courses

Introduction to applications of networked computers, especially social, educational, and information management. Understanding of the networking, computing, and software infrastructures enabling and constraining these networked applications, with the goal of empowering the student to use these technologies effectively in their personal and professional life. Related policy, legal, economic, and industry issues.

MWF 1-2 | 247 Cory
Instructor(s): David Messerschmitt
CCN:
42892

Core Courses

Three hours of lecture per week. Project planning and scheduling, process design, project management and coordination. Analysis of information needs, specification of system requirements, analysis of alternatives, design of alternatives. Quantitative methods and tools for analysis and decision making. Document management. Design, implementation, and evaluation of a project.

This is the fourth required course for all Masters students in the School of Information Management and Systems, and it is open for enrollment only to students in the School.

The course provides a general introduction to information and knowledge management in organizations, including:

  • An introduction to tools and methods for the analysis and design of information systems.
  • The management of the process of information system analysis and design, that is, project management.
  • Analyzing the social and organizational contexts of information technologies, in everyday work, in solving problems, and in managing organizational change.

One primary objective of the course is for the student to conduct an analysis of an information system and, if appropriate, design an alternate system. This system may be a manual procedure in need of improvement, a manual system that needs automation, automated procedures that need improvement, or an analytic study of an existing system. This analysis is due at the last lecture of the course and will be accompanied by a class presentation of its results. Projects are to be done on an individual basis.

The course provides the student with the tools to conduct the study. Among the topics covered in the lectures and readings are the process of identifying and selecting projects, project initiation, systems requirements determination, system data collection, interviewing and questionnaire development, workflow analysis and design, data flow diagramming, statistical and cost analysis, forms and screen design, and the implementation and evaluation of systems. It is up to the student to find a project for the course. The instructors will provide guidance. The break between semesters is a good time to begin looking for organizations and/or systems that need analysis and/or improvement.

Knowledge management topics include observing and analyzing organizational dynamics in working groups, in presentations and meetings, personnel actions and budget development, managing change and the role of institutional cultures in implementing technical change to increase productivity.

Part of the course is devoted to the use of Microsoft Project, a project management system. The student will use Project to develop a schedule of the activities for the project and will supply updated schedules to the instructors during the semester.

In addition to the analysis/design project, there will be additional assignments in specific management areas and to develop skills on the topics covered in the lectures. Among these assignments are the use of statistical analysis tools, spreadsheet programs, and data-flow modeling tools.

TTh 9:30-11 | 202 South Hall
CCN:
42703

General Courses

Science and Technology Studies (STS) is an interdisciplinary field concerned with two areas of interest to us: the interaction between technology and the social; and knowledge communities. Recent years have seen increased interaction between STS and human-computer interaction (HCI), information and communication technologies for development (ICTD), and new media.

This class will be a seminar emphasizing close reading and discussion of some classic STS works, along with more current research, emphasizing that which is relevant to information and computing technologies, and knowledge communities. Our concern will be with how these can help us understand the relationships among information technology and new media, especially design; knowledge communities; and the social.

Topics will depend in part on who’s in the class and people’s interests. Past years' topics include Social Construction of Technology (SCOT), Actor-Network Theory (ANT), Activity Theory, configuring users, epistemic cultures, situated action, reflective/critical HCI, and distributed cognition. Some of these topics are introduced in I203 but, of necessity, not in the depth. In I212, we address how these topics are useful for understanding the relationships among information technology, design, and the social. This course won’t help you get a job, but it may help you better understand what you are doing and why.

This class is open to any interested graduate student. It is particularly appropriate for I School Ph.D. students; I School master’s students interested in conceptual issues underlying some of their more applied coursework; and graduate students doing a new media emphasis, and from related departments. Past students have been from departments as varied as architecture, mechanical engineering, and education.

MW 11-12:30 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Barry Wellman
CCN:
42706

Three hours of lecture per week. User interface design and human-computer interaction. Examination of alternative design. Tools and methods for design and development. Human- computer interaction. Methods for measuring and evaluating interface quality.

This course covers the design, prototyping, and evaluation of user interfaces to computers which is often called Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). It is loosely based on course CS1 described in the ACM SIGCHI Curricula for Human-Computer Interaction (Association for Computing Machinery, 1992).

HCI covers many topics including:

  1. Human capabilities (e.g., visual and auditory perception, memory, mental models, and interface metaphors);
  2. Interface technology (e.g., input and output devices, interaction styles, and common interface paradigms); and,
  3. Interface design methods (e.g., user-centered design, prototyping, and design principles and rules), and interface evaluation (e.g., software logging, user observation, benchmarks and experiments).

This material is covered through lectures, reading, discussions, homework assignments, and a course project. This course differs from CS 160 primarily in two ways:

  1. There is an emphasis on interfaces for information technology applications; and,
  2. There is less emphasis on programming and system development, although some simple prototyping (for example, in visual basic or using JAVA GUI development tools) may be required. (CS 160 has a big programming project.)
TTh 11-12:30 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Marti Hearst
CCN:
42709

This course addresses concepts and methods of user experience research. The emphasis will be on methods of collecting and interpreting many kinds of data about real-world user activities and practices and translating them into design decisions. The course includes hands-on practice with a number of major user experience research methods, including heuristic evaluation; observation; interviews, surveys and focus groups. The emphasis will be on naturalistic/ethnographic (qualitative) methods, but we will also address major quantitative methods. Finally, we will discuss methods of bringing user experience research into the design process.

This course is appropriate for both 1st and 2nd-year MIMS students, and for students from other departments with a strong interest in user experience research, with the instructor's permission. Students will complete at least one major group project related to needs assessment and evaluation. Second-year MIMS students may use this project to meet their capping project requirement.

M 3:30-6 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Nancy Van House
CCN:
42712

This course will survey results in computer security, cryptography, and privacy, with an emphasis on work done in the last 3 years. Student projects (creative work, demonstrations, or literature reviews) will form a substantial portion of the course work.

TTh 12:30-2 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Doug Tygar
CCN:
42715

Three hours of lecture per week. This course provides both a general introduction to management and management science with a focus on issues in complex information organizations. The course is useful to those who will work in organizations and will be involved in the analysis, design, or delivery of information services and systems, especially those in management positions. The specific topics are chosen to complement the topics in INFOSYS 208. The course is designed for students who do not have a degree in management.

One focus is on both the internal and external issues and practices of management. Internal issues include organizational behavior, organizational theory, personnel, budgeting, and planning. External issues include organizational environments, politics, marketing, funding sources, and strategic planning.

The other focus is on management science tools, such as optimization, game theory, and queuing theory (the study of throughput and waiting lines).

Assignments will be on both an individual and group basis.

TTh 2-3:30 | 205 South Hall
CCN:
42718

This course will introduce students to policy issues and analytical methods in the areas of information systems, communications, computing, and media. Economic, political, social, and legal perspectives will be introduced. The specific topics will vary from year to year and will reflect the current interests of the students and the instructor, but the following list should suggest the range of areas likely to be covered.

Possible Outline of Topics:

  1. Background on Information Policy — Domestic
  2. Background on Information Policy — International
  3. Infrastructure Issues and Technological Change: The Case of NREN, the Internet, NGI, etc.
  4. Ownership of Information: Property Rights
  5. Intellectual Freedom
  6. Access to Information
  7. Public vs. Private Provision of Information
  8. User Fees for Government-Provided Information
  9. Information Markets
  10. Privacy
  11. Mass Media & Common Carriers
  12. National Security
  13. Standards, Elements of Industrial Policy
  14. Trans-border data flows
  15. Consumer information
  16. Medical and health information
M 2-5 | 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Peter Lyman
CCN:
42721

Factors strongly impacting the success of new computing and communications products and services (based on underlying technologies such as electronics and software) in commercial applications. Technology trends and limits, economics, standardization, intellectual property, government policy, and industrial organizations. Strategies to manage the design and marketing of successful products and services.

TTh 9:30-11 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): David Messerschmitt, Hal Varian
CCN:
42724

This course will be an introduction into the past, present, and future of the theory and practice of multimedia information systems. Through readings in semiotics, film and media theory, and the history and theory of computation and computational media, we will examine the development and differentiation of media into distinct technologies and data flows, as well as their subsequent mixing and re-mixing.

We will establish a conceptual and historical foundation to design, assess, and critique multimedia information systems. We will explore the theory and methods of the multimedia production cycle, including the editing, storage, retrieval, management, and distribution of digital media. Students will apply their theoretical knowledge in working hands-on to learn video and audio production practices

Tu 1-4 | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Howard Besser
CCN:
42727

This course offers a multidisciplinary inquiry into the technology, business, economics, and public-policy of computer networks and distributed applications. We will cover the technical foundations of computer networks, including: Internet architecture, network technologies and protocols (e.g., 802.*, TCP/IP, HTTP), routing algorithms and policies, network applications (e.g., p2p overlays, VoIP), emerging network technologies, and network security. Tightly integrated will be coverage on the business, economics and policy of networking, including: economic characteristics of networks, network industry structure and ISP competition, wireless spectrum auction, network neutrality, and incentive-centered design of networks and applications.

MW 12:30-2 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Mark Ginsburg
CCN:
42730

Three hours of lecture per week. Group development of database applications using a commercial database management system. Includes developing functional specifications, data model, database design, interface design, system implementation, documentation.

Tu 3:30-5:30 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Michael Cooper
CCN:
42733

Three hours of lecture per week. Quantitative methods for data collection and analysis. Research design. Conceptualization, operationalization, measurement. Modes of data collection, including experiments, survey research, observation. Sampling. Basics of data analysis.

MW 2-3:30 | 202 South Hall
Instructor(s): Barry Wellman
CCN:
42736

Special Topics Courses

Three hours of lecture per week. General introduction to the organization and administration of library services and their place in the institutions and communities they serve. Problems and practices with respect to governance, functions, collections, and building. Management functions as applicable: planning, organizing, innovation, staffing, budgeting, controlling. Technological change.

Objectives: Designing Library Services serves both as an introduction to library services and an introduction to working in libraries. Intended for first or second year students in the Master's in Information Management & Systems program, it has the following objectives:

  1. General knowledge of the concepts, vocabulary, and techniques of organizations and management.
  2. Introduction to social, economic, political and technological context of academic, public, school, and special libraries.
  3. General knowledge of how libraries function.
  4. Identification of major challenges and opportunities facing college and university libraries.
  5. Identification of skills for survival and success as professionals.

Means:

  1. Lectures, guest lectures, class discussion.
  2. Required readings; also recommended and 'resource' reading.
  3. Assignments: Analysis of a manager's roles; Review of an unfamiliar library; Budget exercise; Planning exercise ('Critical path analysis'); Accounting exercise; Position description; Job announcement; Review of a popular management book; Case studies; etc.
  4. Specialized small group project: Typically preparing recommendations for change in a library service: A charge; Goals & objectives; Recommended course(es) of action; Organizational, personnel, space, and other requirements; Resources required; Alternatives. Literature summary. (Suitable for the required Final Project of the Master's' degree.)

Expectations of students: Open to first and second year Master's students. Class attendance and participation. Readings, some required, some recommended. Individual assignments. Small group project participation. Individual consultation. Written work to be well-written and on time.

Section: 1
F 9-12 | 107 South Hall
Instructor(s): Michael Buckland
CCN:
42739

Computing and information technology are dramatically changing peoples' lives, and more change is to come. The promise of ubiquitous computing is that people will be assisted by computers in many new ways, and will interact with them naturally, on the human's rather than the machine's terms. Computing research today is about new ways of connecting people to computers, people to knowledge, people to the physical world, and people to people. Computers must function in human contexts, rather than requiring people to learn and follow the machine's rules. That requires a thorough understanding of those contexts. HCC is an interdisciplinary program involving sociology, psychology, and education theory as well as computer science and engineering. Its goal is to study social contexts and human behavior, to design and evaluate computer applications in those contexts. HCC can be viewed as an evolution of HCI (Human-Computer Interaction), but represents a shift in perspective. HCC is not an area within computer science, but represents a theme that impacts all areas of CS. It coincides with the transition of computing from tools built for and by professionals to tools for everyday tasks for "every citizen". Understanding the complexity and diversity of human behavior will be an important first step in building the future "killer applications" of computing.

The course includes talks by leading researchers from on and off campus on HCC-related topics. The talks are about current research, but are colloquium-style and accessible to a broad audience. The goal is to allow graduate students from one of the participating areas to undertake research that cuts across the HCC areas, or to partner with students from other HCC fields.

Section: 3
Tu 4-5:30 | 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): John Canny, Nancy Van House
CCN:
42723

This seminar explores issues of design and structure of Web-based resources. The course has been developed to complement the paid work of SIMS students building Web-based support for large undergraduate courses (see http://www.sims.berkeley.edu/courses/web-design/webdesign-about.html). Examples from students' on-the-job experience fuel discussion of longevity issues, issues of dealing with clients, and consideration of more advanced Web tools (such as database back-ends, multimedia, virtual environments, etc.). Enrollment is limited.

Section: 2
W 12-2 | 205 South Hall
Instructor(s): Howard Besser
CCN:
42741

Seminars & Colloquia

It is often said that the 21st century will be an information society: one in which intellectual property will drive the global economy, and yet, at the same time, free access to information and new modes of communication will create a more just civil society and polity. For all of the power of these ideas, there is little agreement on the definition of an information society in theory, on whether one exists or is emerging in practice, and the nature of the legal rules and technological inventions necessary to create a good or just information society. This seminar explores both the theory and practice of the information society: testing theory through case studies, and seeking the theoretical assumptions behind information policy proposals, legal cases, legislation and political disputes.

At the heart of current debates about copyright law and policy in Congress, on the net, and in the international community are some fundamentally different conceptions about the nature of intellectual property, its role in the information economy, and the kind of social order into which intellectual property can and should fit. This seminar asks how intellectual property rules might be framed so as simultaneously to allow the information economy to thrive and contribute to a just social order. It does so by considering social theories of the information society, policy documents on intellectual property and electronic commerce for the information society, and analyses of particular issues, such as the responsibility that online service providers should have for infringing conduct by users, the future of fair use in digital networked environments, and the social implications of technical protections for copyrighted works.

The seminar is deeply interdisciplinary in character, as the subject requires. Its instructors come from different fields, law and political science, and welcome students from a wide variety of fields. Insights from many fields are needed to construct a just information society and workable intellectual property rules. The seminar draws upon readings from many disciplines and perspectives, including social theory, philosophy, law, art, and business. Background lectures are provided as necessary, but the seminar will mainly feature analysis, discussion, and debate. Students enrolled in the seminar are expected to develop well informed and original perspectives on information society and intellectual property in papers on particular legal or policy issues or concepts.

Section: 3
M 12-2 | 110 South Hall
CCN:
42747

The seminar explores selected advanced topics relating to 'digital libraries' with special emphasis on:

  • Access to networked resources
  • Use of two or more resources in conjunction
  • Combined use of two or more retrieval systems (e.g. use of pre- or post-processing to enhance the capabilities)
  • The redesign of library services

It is expected that these issues will require attention to a number of questions about the nature of information retrieval processes, the feasibility of not-yet-conventional techniques, techniques of making different systems work together, social impact, and the reconsideration of past practices. More generally, the seminar is intended to provide a forum for advanced students in the School. Anyone interested in these topics is welcome to join in — and to talk about their own work. This is a continuation of the previous Lynch/Buckland seminars.

Section: 1
F 3-5 | 107 South Hall
CCN:
42742

It is often said that the 21st century will be an information society: one in which intellectual property will drive the global economy, and yet, at the same time, free access to information and new modes of communication will create a more just civil society and polity. For all of the power of these ideas, there is little agreement on the definition of an information society in theory, on whether one exists or is emerging in practice, and the nature of the legal rules and technological inventions necessary to create a good or just information society. This seminar explores both the theory and practice of the information society: testing theory through case studies, and seeking the theoretical assumptions behind information policy proposals, legal cases, legislation and political disputes.

At the heart of current debates about copyright law and policy in Congress, on the net, and in the international community are some fundamentally different conceptions about the nature of intellectual property, its role in the information economy, and the kind of social order into which intellectual property can and should fit. This seminar asks how intellectual property rules might be framed so as simultaneously to allow the information economy to thrive and contribute to a just social order. It does so by considering social theories of the information society, policy documents on intellectual property and electronic commerce for the information society, and analyses of particular issues, such as the responsibility that online service providers should have for infringing conduct by users, the future of fair use in digital networked environments, and the social implications of technical protections for copyrighted works.

Section: 2
Tu 4-6 | 110 South Hall
Instructor(s): Peter Lyman, Pamela Samuelson
CCN:
42745