Jeremy Gordon

Jeremy Gordon

PhD Student

Focus

Embodied cognition, prediction and prospection. I use biophysiological sensing and VR to study human behavior in naturalistic settings.

Specialization

Data Science
Product Management
Software Development
User Experience Design & Research

Biography

Like the ISchool, computational cognitive science is inherently interdisciplinary, and pulls in theory and methods from psychology, computer science & AI research, philosophy of mind, and human computer interaction.

I'm interested in how situated minds transform sensory information into causal models of the world, and the algorithms by which we select interventions to empirically test, update, and exploit these models. Specifically, I aim to investigate enactive theories of cognition and the role of embodied simulation, imagination, and prospection as part of decision-making processes across multiple time scales and levels of abstraction. I use emerging technologies like virtual reality and biosensing devices to investigate human behavior in the context of uncertainty, as well as to lend insight into critical ethical questions about the use, and trajectory, of such technologies.

As a researcher with a mixed identity as a designer and engineer, the objective of understanding cognition through the lens of information processing is both an end and a means. I'm interested in applying a growing understanding of how our brains solve complex problems to collective intelligence settings that might benefit from improved communication and collaboration.

Before coming to the ISchool, I was a product designer, technologist and entrepreneur working on projects in Kenya, Tanzania, and Rwanda. I graduated from Stanford University with degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Political Science. I moved to Kenya in 2010 with Kiva.org, and subsequently co-founded Echo Mobile, a Nairobi-based firm that empowers organizations with mobile technology to understand the realities of the field, and make data-driven decisions.

Last updated:

November 12, 2018