UC Berkeley Campus between 1898 and 1905 (photo courtesy of the Library of Congress)
Special Event

104th Birthday Celebration

Friday, October 28, 2022
2:30 pm to 4:00 pm

In 1918 UC Berkeley began a full-time program in library science. Join us for this year’s celebration of the founding and history of the School of Information, School of Information Management and Systems, School of Library and Information Studies, and School of Librarianship.


Presentations

Judy Yung: Librarian to Activist Historian
Emma Frothingham
Processing Archivist
Special Collections, Stanford University

Focusing on the Future with the Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity
Ann Cleaveland
Executive Director
Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity, UC Berkeley

Quantum Information Science
Professor Chris Hoofnagle
Faculty Director
Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity, UC Berkeley

Reception to follow.


RSVP

The event is full, but additional remote viewers are welcome.

Guest Information

Presentation Details

Judy Yung: Librarian to Activist Historian

Emma Frothingham headshot
Emma Frothingham

Emma Frothingham
Processing Archivist
Special Collections, Stanford University

After working in public libraries in Oakland and San Francisco, Judy Yung, MLS ’68, built a career advocating for the Chinese American community as a historian. Following projects to preserve the Chinese poems carved into the walls of the Angel Island Immigration Station by former detainees and document the experiences of Chinese American women around the country, Yung decided to pursue a more academic career. She went on to publish a number of books on Angel Island and the Chinese American experience, and taught courses in American Studies at UC Santa Cruz. Even though her work moved away from traditional librarianship, she continued to rely heavily on archives in her research, believed in the importance of serving diverse communities, and ensured that her work was accessible to a wide audience well into the future.

Emma Frothingham is a processing archivist in Special Collections at Stanford University. She holds a BA in history, music, and German from Beloit College and an MLIS with an emphasis on archives from Simmons University.

Focusing on the Future with the Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity

Ann Cleaveland

Ann Cleaveland
Executive Director
Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity, UC Berkeley

The UC Berkeley School of Information launched the Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity in 2015 with a singular goal: to amplify the upside of the digital revolution. Intentionally housed at the I School, with its history of interdisciplinary scholarship, CLTC's mission is to help people and organizations anticipate and address tomorrow's cybersecurity challenges. In honor of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, this discussion will acquaint the audience with the vital safety and privacy questions being researched at the Center; our efforts - with the Masters of Cybersecurity and Information program - to grow the talent pipeline and expand who participates in cybersecurity; and the cybersecurity opportunities and risks that are just over the horizon as we launch “Cybersecurity Futures 2030” this fall.

Ann Cleaveland is the executive director of the Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity, where she is responsible for growing key partnerships, managing day-to-day operations, and stewarding a strategy to fulfill the mission of CLTC’s multidisciplinary research center. Her research interests include cybersecurity futures, digital risk communications, and governance of cyber risk. Cleaveland is a senior leader and business manager with experience in philanthropy, non-profit management, and industry. Prior to joining CLTC, she served as the senior director of strategic planning at the ClimateWorks Foundation, where she led multiple initiatives focused on supporting a large, philanthropic collaborative in a more strategic, effective, and science-based response to global climate change.

Quantum Information Science

Chris Hoofnagle headshot
Chris Hoofnagle

Professor Chris Hoofnagle
Faculty Director
Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity, UC Berkeley

The combination of information theory and quantum mechanics reveals powerful new insights and extraordinary opportunities for innovation. Quantum Information Science (QIS) will profoundly change how we sense and make sense of the world. In this brief talk I will explain quantum sensing and computing and their strategic implications.

Chris Hoofnagle is a professor of practice in the School of Information and faculty director of the Center for Long Term Cybersecurity.

Last updated:

October 27, 2022