Info 290A

Special Topics in Information

1-2 units

Course Description

Course may be repeated for credit. One and one-half to two hours of lecture per week for eight weeks. Two hours of lecture per week for six weeks. Three hours of lecture per week for five weeks.

Prerequisites

Consent of instructor

Courses Offered

Course may be repeated for credit. One and one-half to two hours of lecture per week for eight weeks. Two hours of lecture per week for six weeks. Three hours of lecture per week for five weeks.

This course will explore the make-up of the healthcare industry, how healthcare players set strategy, the impact of system design on healthcare strategies, and the implications of these strategies on the future of the healthcare sector and society more broadly. The first two-thirds of the course will examine strategy in the US context. The last third will explore how different international models of healthcare influence strategy, and what these might mean for the future of US healthcare as well.

Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture per week for five weeks.

Course may be repeated for credit. One and one-half to two hours of lecture per week for eight weeks. Two hours of lecture per week for six weeks. Three hours of lecture per week for five weeks.

Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture per week for five weeks.

This short seminar will explore differences among theoretical perspectives by asking:

  • What does it mean to “have a theoretical perspective?”
  • How do you come to recognize different theoretical stances as you read and consider the work of others?
  • What are the implications of those differences for scholarly work and social engagement with the world?

One way to take up these questions is to look closely at how scholars/researchers approach the same problem from different perspectives. The course will take as a central text for this examination Understanding Practice: Perspectives on Activity and Context (Chaiklin and Lave, editors). All researchers in this collection of ethnographic studies address issues about learning, knowledge and social practice. The challenge for the seminar is to inquire into the theoretical stances that permeate these projects — similarly and differently. This will involve attempting to answer the seminar questions as we go along. Besides being more acute readers of academic work by the end of the seminar, students will have (we hope) a hands-on grasp of the craft of social theorizing, and an introduction to contrasting theories of learning, knowledge, context, and practice.

Last updated:

September 2, 2016